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Alex Cole

Alex Cole

Alex Cole is a Technical Analysis and Charting product specialist. With over 14 years of financial market experience, Alex has led Technical Analysis and data visualization teams, frequently contributed to financial news/ industry organizations such as Bloomberg and the Chartered Market Technicians Association and helped direct both business strategy and software development.

Alex has created and implemented global Technical Analysis trainings internally for large corporations and for private clients.  He created the popular Chameleon Indicators on the Bloomberg terminal. His most recent work is the “GoNoGo” Charting system, technical indicators that blend several technical concepts to uncover actionable market trends.

In April 2017 Alex was a speaker at the 44th annual CMT Association Symposium in New York City and has conducted several webinars for the CMT as part of their educational webinar series.

Currently, Alex is the SME for Wiley’s CMT product responsible for creating instructor materials and video lectures for the prep course. He earned his MA in English Literature and MBA in Global Management from Fairleigh Dickinson University.

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Technical analysis has always been focused on the application of knowledge. In the early editions of Edwards and Magee’s Technical Analysis of Stock Trends, they focused on how to trade chart patterns. But these pioneers of the field also included a theory explaining why the pattern should work.  While applying the ideas of technical analysis is still the important consideration to practitioners, many academic researchers are working to uncover why the techniques work. In this month’s newsletter, we provide articles highlighting both the application of technical analysis and the research that technical analysis is stimulating in the academic community.  This month’s newsletter also includes a summary of Tom Dorsey’s presentation at the Annual Symposium. The Symposium truly does provide a year’s worth of ideas and we will be presenting summaries of those ideas in the months ahead. Videos of this year’s presentations and the previous four years are available at http://symposium.mta.org/ and can be viewed at anytime. As always, we welcome your feedback. Please let us know what you think of Technically Speaking, the MTA magazine, by emailing us at editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, June 2015 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-june-2015 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:28:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:28:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=44215 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 359247 [post_id] => 44215 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_8_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"26099";} ) [1] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 44248 [post_author] => 35924 [post_date] => 2015-05-15 12:00:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-15 16:00:41 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Ethics is the lead story in this month’s magazine. The MTA is adopting a large body of knowledge related to all areas of finance through a licensing agreement with the CFA Institute. All finance professionals, whether they analyze fundamental, quantitative or technical data, share common goals (finding profitable opportunities) and share a common operating environment. Given all of the commonalities, it’s not surprising we share the same ethical requirements. This new body of knowledge will not require members of the MTA to change anything they do professionally. The original MTA Code of Ethics was comprehensive and covered all of the important standards of professional behavior. The shortcoming was a lack of case studies and examples of how to apply the Code. This licensing agreement makes all of the CFAI’s Code and Standards developed over several decades available to MTA members. For CMT candidates, this licensing agreement provides clear readings which will make studying for the exam a more efficient process. In short, there are no changes required of MTA members to meet the requirements of the new Code and Standards. One benefit is that there are now examples of how to apply ethics in everyday situations. Another benefit is the clear material that CMT candidates will have to study ethics so that there will be no surprises on the exam related to ethics. In short, we have found a risk-free opportunity to partner with the CFA Institute and we are excited to begin the next stage of the MTA’s growth. We also have articles related to the tools technicians use to analyze the markets and the techniques they apply to find profitable trading opportunities. As always, we welcome your feedback on what you would like to see in future issues of Technically Speaking. Please let us know by emailing us at editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, May 2015 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-may-2015 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:31:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:31:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=44248 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 359917 [post_id] => 44248 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_7_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"26099";} ) )

Contributions