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Andrew Thrasher, CMT

Andrew Thrasher, CMT

Andrew Thrasher, CMT is a Portfolio Manager with Financial Enhancement Group, LLC, a wealth management firm in Indianapolis, Indiana that works with high net-worth families and corporate pension plans. Mr. Thrasher manages one tactical strategy, co-manages five asset allocations strategies, and one alternative strategy.  Mr. Thrasher is also the founder of Thrasher Analytics, LLC, an independent research company that focuses on volatility timing and technical analysis of the financial markets. 

His analysis has been referenced in pieces written for CNBC, MarketWatch, Bloomberg, Fox Business, ValueWalk, Yahoo! Finance, and U.S. News. Andrew is also a featured contributor to Investing.com, See It Market, and Yahoo! Finance.

Andrew was the 2017 Charles H. Dow Award winner for his research paper, Forecasting a Volatility Tsunami. He holds a Series 65 securities license. He has a bachelor’s degree in Financial Counseling and Planning from Purdue University and resides in the Indianapolis area along with his wife, Abby, and their dog, Brooke.

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            [post_content] => There are many songs about the end of summer, most talking about getting back to work or school, essentially ending the lazy, carefree days. If that’s you, perhaps you forgot this is 2020! Up is down, Zoom is the word and Wednesday is Sunday (at Carvel). People cannot wait for fall, hoping that things will get better on the virus, economic and back-to-school fronts.

However, after several months of really good stock market action, September gave also us that rude awakening that stocks can actually go down, and by a lot, in any given day. Even worse, crude oil, after sitting there for months, looks terrible again. And the greenback, after hitting a multi-year low, looks kind of “bottomy.” Is that it for gold?

Never let it be said that the markets – all of them – are boring.

Now that we are all supposed to be back at work, whether virtual or in person, it is time to get back to our plans. Of course, not the same old plans, but plans to move forward, nonetheless. As you will see, content here is a bit beefier now than it was over the summer. And the Association is getting back to long-range planning and getting CMT testing back into gear. This month, we also announce the 2021 Charles H. Dow Award, with updated submission requirements.

Also in this edition, we have Rui Matos’ article on seasonality in the commodities markets, and how to hedge/profit using options. Alon Horesh shares his thoughts on Machine Learning with regard to finding support and resistance levels. And this month’s member interview is with Vincent Randazzo, CMT, from Lowry Research.

From the Association, we’ve got membership news, and an announcement for remote proctoring in the CMT exams. The Washington DC/Baltimore had a virtual meeting in July and offered a few notes about their guest speaker.

There you go. Keep your fingers crossed that we are on the road to normalcy.

Michael Kahn, CMT

Editor
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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Many publications are dedicating January issues to a look at the year that was or a forecast for the year that is to be. We decided to ignore time and in this issue of Technically Speaking we review timeless techniques. Gaps, for example, have been a part of charts for hundreds of years and will always be visible on charts. This month, we review the Dow Award-winning paper written by Julie R. Dahlquist, PH.D., CMT and Richard J. Bauer, JR., PH.D., that explains how to trade gaps. Relative strength (RS) is also a technique that has worked for decades and is likely to continue providing useful trade signals in the future. John Lewis, CMT, from Dorsey Wright & Associates, expands on how RS can be applied to generate profits. Looking a little bit ahead, Tom Dorsey, co-founder of Dorsey Wright & Associates, will have more insights into successful strategies at the MTA Symposium in March. Bloomberg recently highlighted a useful application of the relative strength index (RSI) in Bloomberg Briefs and a summary of that information is presented here. Andrew Thrasher, CMT, then explains how copper has been replaced by semis in the modern economy as a stock market indicator. While trend lines have been useful in the past and will be useful in the future, Greg Schnell, CMT, demonstrates that they can be applied incorrectly. In an article that does provide a specific forecast for 2015, Mark Ungewitter uses timeless techniques like the Dow/Gold ratio, cycles, market breadth and the Coppock Curve to look at the stock market. Although we try to provide articles that will interest everyone, if we aren’t featuring a topic you find interesting, please let us know what you’d like to see more of by emailing us at editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, January 2015 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-january-2015 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:30:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:30:28 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=44513 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 366031 [post_id] => 44513 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_3_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"29473";} ) )

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