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Jeffrey S. Weiss, CMT

Jeffrey S. Weiss, CMT

Jeffrey Weiss, CMT, is chief technical analyst at Clearview Trading Advisors in New York City.  His new book is “Relationship Investing: Stock Market Therapy for Your Money,” (Skyhorse Publishing, 2017). Find out more about the author at www.aaii.com/authors/jeffrey-weiss. Weiss will speak at the AAII Investor Conference this fall in Orlando, Florida.

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            [post_content] => Well gang, we made it. The New Year is here and 2020 is in the rear-view mirror. I hope we all learned something, and that includes something about market behavior.

Although the stock market ended at all-time highs, it was a rather lackluster December with not much in the way of enthusiasm. Of course, we can come up with all sorts of excuses, such as politics, pandemics (not to make light of it) and payments (stimulus, or lack thereof). This did not matter, as Santa came a-calling and stocks came out of the gate at full gallop. Bitcoin at $42,000. Nothing to see here, bubbleheads. Maybe a breakout in bond yields might get you worried? Move along. How about Tesla? Who cares, as long as the Russell is outperforming?

You can take away what you like from all of that. Most of us, of course, will let the charts tell us when something is changing.

The January edition of Technically Speaking is Association-centric, with news of and about our membership and activities. Topping the list is the inaugural edition of our new official podcast, Fill the Gap, featuring first Association president Bob Farrell. We even have an old photo of Bob in the Photo Archive this month.

Also, read about the Academic Partner Program, as we expand the presence and teaching of technical analysis at the university level. And don’t forget, nominations for new Directors of the Association are now open. This is a good time to network and find out who can help steer the Association for the next few years.

This month’s member interview is with Jeff Weiss, CMT, who many members know as an energetic speaker and educator, not to mention a pretty good technician. We’ve got the regular Association news, including some career opportunities, a chapter speaker summary and announcement of the upcoming Weath365 Summit, where several of our members are speaking and all members are welcome at no cost.

Don’t forget, we are always looking for contributed articles and you can repurpose something you’ve already written. Just limit it to education, market environment or the business of being a technician. Market forecasts do not age well. We are always here at editor@cmtassociation.org.

Michael Kahn, CMT

Editor
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Letter from the Editor

As we start a new year, many people take the time to reflect on where they are, and where they have been. Considering the state of our discipline at this time, we can note that technical analysis is widely accepted and well covered in the investment community. Bloomberg terminals dominate the professional landscape and offer news and analysis, but also charts and thousands of variations of charting. For those without access to these terminals, some type of charting software is the dominant application on their desktop. It is very likely that most MTA members and affiliates can’t even remember a time when technical analysis wasn’t widely accepted. More than a decade ago, day trading became popular, and these strategies more often than not involved technical tools. But only a decade before that, in the mid-1980s, technical analysis was limited to a small part of the investment community and FNN, the predecessor to CNBC, devoted only a small part of their programming to the subject. In many ways, we are experiencing the same lack of acceptance in the academic community. While many professors scoff at the tools we use profitably, in some ways it is just a debate rooted in semantics. Technicians focus on practical solutions, and academics focus on statistically valid proofs. The objective is the same but the language is different. In time, technical analysis will break down the barriers faced in academia, just as it gained acceptance among professionals and individual investors. The MTA is leading the way in this push, expanding membership among professionals and students, and taking steps to ensure that the CMT remains the gold standard level of professional certification. Hopefully, this newsletter meets your needs and helps further the goals of the MTA. With the introduction of the continuing education program, professionals can earn credits by contributing to the newsletter. Aspiring professionals, including those still in college, can distinguish themselves in the highly competitive job market by adding writing credits to their resumes. We look forward to serving you in the year ahead, Sincerely, Mike Carr, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, January 2011 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-january-2011 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-11 18:47:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-11 22:47:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=47315 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 412315 [post_id] => 47315 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_1_contributor [meta_value] => a:2:{i:0;s:5:"42475";i:1;s:5:"43131";} ) )

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