public

John R. Kirby

John R. Kirby

Bio Coming

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From the Editor’s Desk

On the cover of this month’s issue, we pay our respects to Jerry Favors. Mr. Favors was an early icon of technical analysis that came onto the financial scene in the mid-1980s. He was known for his respect for and deep knowledge of the works of the old masters of technical analysis like Edson Gould and George Lindsay. His work was widely known and highly respected throughout the financial world. Young technicians should consider picking up where Mr. Favors left off by exploring the works of the old masters that he loved so much. Inside, we present a new addition to Technically Speaking. Meet A CMT. This monthly column interviews a relatively new, up-and-coming CMT for the purpose of introducing him or her to the Membership. Kudos to Contributing Editor Garry Rissman for a job well done on this inaugural column. Also inside is another new addition to TS, our Letters To The Editor column, and also an update on the MTA’s Educational Seminar in New York City this May. Finally, I’d like to announce that this will be my last issue as the Editor of Technically Speaking. Our Nominating Committee has decided to go in a different direction, with a new slate of incoming officers for the upcoming MTA elections in June. As an outgoing Board member, I believe it is in the best interests of the Association to turn the reins over to the incoming Board as soon as possible so they can get off to a running start with their own agenda and initiatives. I believe an integral part of that should be installing a new Editor, since Technically Speaking is the voice of the MTA and a means for the incoming Board to inform us of its new direction and to support its new policies. As outgoing Vice President, I tried to use my position as Editor to do that very thing, and the new Board should have the opportunity to do so as well. Please take the time to carefully read the columns written by Jordan Kotick and John Kirby, our outgoing President and Executive Director. Jordan’s column gives a detailed overview of the changes that took place within your MTA during the past few years, and John provides us with a detailed look at the MTA’s current financial condition. I am very proud to have been a part of this Board which made a lot of changes that, although unpopular in some circles, turned the MTA from a 25-year old private club to a world-recognized professional society who’s CMT I and II tests are now accredited as a surrogate for the Series 86 exams. Special thanks to my Board colleagues and friends Jordan Kotick, Barry Sine and John Kirby who made it all happen, and best of luck to the incoming Board members and to the MTA. John Kosar, CMT Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, April, 2006 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-april-2006 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-05 16:29:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-05 20:29:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52098 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 535814 [post_id] => 52098 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_0_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"52100";} ) [1] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52114 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2006-02-15 12:00:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2006-02-15 17:00:41 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

First of all, I’m very pleased to report that we are starting to see a little more participation from our Membership, in terms of contributions to your Newsletter, Technically Speaking. However, we still have a long way to go. Ironically, the portion of our Membership that has shown the most interest in contributing to TS has been our ever-growing overseas contingent. For example, in this month’s issue, we have an interesting analysis of the Sensex, the Indian stock market index, by Mohan Turaga, who is actually a Contributing Editor from India. Equally ironic is that, sadly, most of our Regions here in the States have not responded to our repeated requests for a brief article now and then, just to recap their monthly meetings and generally keep the rest of the Association abreast of what they are doing in their particular area of the country. We have even gone so far as to offer to provide digital cameras to any region that would agree to send us a monthly meeting recap now and then and a couple of pictures. The offer still stands, and I continue to hope the Regions will eventually come around and get more involved. Moving on to this month’s issue, we lead off with an article on Bow Ties by Dave Landry. This is not about outdated clothing from the 1940s, but rather a relatively new analytical technique (at least to me) that has received some attention recently on the Market List email forum, hosted by our own John Bollinger. Inside, we have an interesting article by Mark Thomas on how the first peers to report during earnings season have a tendency to indicate how the rest of the group will react. In addition, we have included some much-needed and long-overdue levity from MTA Member and CFA Sam Levine entitled “Financial Words You Won’t Hear On TV”. Finally, since I’m the editor, allow me to editorialize for a moment. During the past several years, your MTA Board (of which I am a member) made a series of changes to the infrastructure of the Association. These changes, based on feedback from you, were designed to improve and professionalize the MTA. Our objective was to bring more professional recognition and respect to Market Technicians, with the ultimate goal of creating more jobs and business opportunities for our Membership. As a result, we made a lot of decisions that, at least to some, were very unpopular. Some harsh words were spoken, and a lot of misinformation was circulated. But now, a few years later, securities regulators have granted a Series 86 exemption to those that have passed the CMT I and II exams, our testing process has been radically professionalized and is now administered by the same firm that administers the NASD exams, educational classes are now being offered to CMT candidates around the world via our new electronic classrooms, the MTA is offering an array of various benefits and discounts to Members that were never before available, we have installed a new internet platform that allows us to service our Membership in ways that were never before possible, and is backed by a company that serves more than 40 million individuals and 750 member-based organizations, and we have installed a new, eager, professional staff that understands our new technology and direction and is capable of making it all work. Objections aside, I think our Association is moving forward, and quickly, in ways that we can all be proud of. I hope you all feel the same. John Kosar, CMT Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, February, 2006 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-february-2006 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-05 17:08:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-05 21:08:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52114 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 536348 [post_id] => 52114 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_0_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"52100";} ) [2] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52144 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2005-12-15 12:00:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-12-15 17:00:02 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

Happy Holidays to all our Technically Speaking readers. Since this is the season for giving and also for giving thanks, I’m going to use a little of this space to request the former and do the latter. First of all, many thanks to people like Ashton Dorkins, Garry Rissman and Matt Blackman, who have been a huge asset for the Newsletter since I have been Editor. They have been providing content almost every month. Also, thanks to people like Jeannette Young in New York City and Ross Leinweber in Chicago, we are now starting to get some newsletter participation from the MTA’s regional chapters. That’s the good news. However, there are 16 more Chapters out there that we have not heard from yet, so we clearly can do much better. So, to those involved with a regional group, please drop me a line at editor@mta.org and let me know that you are willing to give a gift to your fellow MTA colleagues by covering your Chapter’s next meeting. For those of you that are relatively new to the business and/or the Association, Technically Speaking is a great way to get your name and face in front of the rest of the membership as we will include your picture and bio in every submission to TS that gets published. I also encourage anyone who has an interesting analytical technique they would like to share, or who has read a great book on technical analysis and would like to share their views on it with the rest of us, please consider writing an article for TS. This is your Newsletter – we would like to fill it with content from as many of you as possible. Now, on to this month’s issue. On the cover, Michael Covel discusses some simple but important techniques for equalizing risk between investments to adjust for differences in volatility and leverage. Inside, MTA affiliate and CMT candidate Matt Blackman reviews a new investment software product that integrates several different approaches into one package. In addition, money manager Rob Hanna uses back-testing to come to some interesting conclusions regarding the effectiveness of the 200-day moving average as a investment tool. Finally, Executive Director John Kirby reports on the MTA’s two most recent accomplishments, the launching of our new technology platform and the debut of the new and improved MTA website. Hope you enjoy the issue. I also hope you will consider contributing to future issues of TS. John Kosar, CMT Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, December, 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-december-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-06 10:58:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-06 14:58:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52144 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 537254 [post_id] => 52144 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_1_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"52100";} ) [3] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52167 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2005-11-15 12:00:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-11-15 17:00:41 [post_content] => From the Editor’s Desk “November Issue of Technically Speaking” I believe these past several years have been the most dynamic and important ones in the history of the MTA. During this time, the MTA grew up. We went from an obscure social club primarily for New-York-based technicians, to a professional regulatory organization (PRO) with an industryaccepted professional certification program, computerized testing and a new state-of-the art computer platform to service its Membership. But, with growth and success often comes change – you just can’t get around it. One of these changes has been our relationship with IFTA, the International Federation of Technical Analysts that our own Ralph Acampora founded many years ago. On the cover, MTA President Jordan Kotick explains our current relationship with IFTA and how we arrived there, and also shares some of the dialogue that he has had with IFTA President Bill Sharp to try to resolve our current conflict. Being on the MTA Board myself, I realize we have already sent out a very detailed account of this issue. But, because we feel it is so important for us to make every effort to accurately inform the Membership on the details of this issue, we would rather provide a little too much information than not enough. Inside, Contributing Editor Mike Carr, covers the July 16th meeting of the Denver Chapter, which featured a presentation by Andy Ratkai on Insider Trading. Also inside, Contributing Editors Jeannette Young and Garry Rissman provide detailed coverage of the October meeting of the New York City Chapter, which featured a presentation by Christopher Cady on Market Profile. Market profile is a relatively obscure charting technique that is very popular with floor traders. This issue also features a “how-to” article by professional trader Austin Passemonte, who uses mathematically-derived pivot point numbers to determine market trend and trading opportunities. Finally, just a quick reminder to make your reservations for the MTA’s 2006 Winter Retreat to be held on January 20th and 21st at the Four Points Sheraton in Miami Beach.. Each session will explore technical analysis from a different perspective, including trading, research and portfolio management. It looks to be a great event, not to mention just being in Miami in January is a great event in itself. Hope you enjoy this issue. John Kosar, CMT Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, November, 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-november-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-06 17:27:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-06 21:27:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52167 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 538011 [post_id] => 52167 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_1_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"52100";} ) [4] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52283 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2005-10-15 12:00:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-10-15 16:00:55 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

As I write this, the commentators on financial television are working themselves into a frenzy as the S&P 500 has just declined below its 200-day moving average for the first time since early July. The index’s negotiation of this widely-watched major trend proxy characterizes the indecision in the financial markets right now as the marketplace ponders the economic effects of two hurricanes that recently destroyed the US gulf coast. Our cover article by Thomas Neuhaus discusses this very topic: the market’s historic reaction to natural disasters. It is both timely and interesting.  Inside, Contributing Editor Garry Rissman has provided us with the dialogue and some great photos from the question and answer session of the the MTA’s 2005 Market Forecast Panel held at the American Management Association headquarters on September 12th in New York City. Panelists included Gail Dudack, CMT, Katie Townshend, CMT, Louise Yamada, CMT, and Jeanette Schwartz Young, CFP, CMT. Also inside, Chicago Chapter Chair Ross Leinweber reports on the August 31st regional meeting in Chicago that featured Buff Dormeier, CMT’s discussion of volume as a confirmation tool. Finally, in the last of a three-part series of how-to articles by Dave Landry of Harvest Capital Management, Dave answers some frequently-asked questions about swing trading. One last reminder: Don’t forget to sign up for the MTA’s Second Annual Mid-Winter Retreat to be held on January 20th and 21st at the Four Points Sheraton in Miami Beach. Each session of this retreat will discuss technical analysis from a different professional perspective: that of the trader, the analyst and the portfolio manager. The relaxed format will also allow time for experienced technicians to sit down and share ideas with one another, which is often one of the most valuable and memorable parts of these events. Just being in Miami Beach in January can be pretty memorable, too. Hope you enjoy this month’s issue. John Kosar, CMT Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, October, 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-october-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-12 11:35:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-12 15:35:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52283 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 539796 [post_id] => 52283 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_1_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"52100";} ) [5] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52305 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2005-09-15 12:00:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-09-15 16:00:24 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

Although September is seasonally a weak month for the stock market, it looks like a pretty strong one for the MTA and Technically Speaking. On the cover, long-time MTA Member and cycles expert Peter Eliades pays tribute to James M. Hurst, who passed away on August 18th at the age of 81. Mr. Hurst is one of the founding fathers of technical analysis. His classic book, “The Profit Magic of Stock Transaction Timing”, was the reason Peter chose technical analysis as his life’s work. Inside, there are some terrific educational articles by Dave Landry on swing trading (Part 2 in a 3-Part series), by Larry Connors on up days in a row versus down days in a row in the stock market, and on inflation-adjusted stock market trends by Dr. Brett Steenbarger. In addition, our Executive Director John Kirby gives us a progress report in the MTA’s transition to our new technology platform, Net Forum by Avectra. Early this year, fellow MTA Board Member Duke Jones and I were personally involved in the process of evaluating our then-current platform, and deciding whether the Association needed to make a change. Although change is always difficult and this situation was no exception, Duke and I determined that it was imperative for the MTA to move to a platform that could accommodate its recent growth, and handle the additional growth expected in the years ahead. Duke and I believe this platform will be the gift that keeps on giving to the MTA in the years to come, and would like to thank John Kirby and his staff for all their hard work during this transition period. Please take a look at the line-up of speakers and agenda for the 18th Annual IFTA Conference in Vancouver in early November, hosted by the Canadian Society of Technical Analysts (CSTA), and the MTA’s 2005 Mid-Winter Retreat in mid-January in Miami Beach. Two great locations, and two great opportunities to learn from and network with other technicians. Check them out. Finally, Technically Speaking would like to welcome four new Contributing Editors; Matt Blackman, Mohan Turaga, Jeannette Young, CMT and Garry Rissman. We look forward to reading articles and reviews by these MTA Members in future issues. The MTA still needs more Associate Editors. If you are interested in getting involved with Technically Speaking, by writing an article, covering a regional meeting, whatever, please contact me at editor@mta.org. All Contributing Editors will be sent a digital camera with all the accessories so we can include more photos in futures issues. We all know technicians like pictures! Hope everyone enjoys this issue. Respectfully, John Kosar, CMT, Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, September, 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-september-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-12 13:06:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-12 17:06:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52305 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 540463 [post_id] => 52305 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_1_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"52100";} ) [6] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52322 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2005-08-15 12:00:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-08-15 16:00:49 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

I’d like to begin by introducing myself as the new Editor of Technically Speaking. I replace Mike Carr, who is stepping down to make a little more time for himself and his family. I know I have a tough act to follow but, fortunately for me, Mike will continue to contribute to Technically Speaking not only as an Associate Editor, but also as a mentor to me as I assume this new role. Speaking of Associate Editors, we need more of them! If you are looking for a way to get more actively involved in your MTA and like to write, this is a great way to do it. I have been an MTA Member for close to 20 years, and I have to say that THE single best benefit of MTA Membership, at least for me, has been the opportunity to network with other members. Through networking with our Membership, I have been able to find everything from obscure data that no one else had, to a new job. But you can’t network with anyone unless you put yourself out there and let others know who you are. Becoming an Associate Editor is a great way to do just that! Each Associate Editor will be listed as such in every issue of TS, and will also have their picture and bio appear with each published article they contribute. We especially need Associate Editors on a Regional level. If you regularly attend any of the MTA’s Regional monthly meetings and would like to cover the meetings for Technically Speaking, please contact me ASAP at editor@mta.org. I will then send you a digital camera, complete with all the accessories and software, so you can also provide us with some photos of your meeting. Again, this is not only a great way to let the rest of the MTA know what your particular region is doing, but an opportunity to let the rest of the Membership get to know you! Now, let’s move on to the Newsletter itself. On the cover of this month’s issue we present our first Regions Spotlight, which covers MTA member Tom McClellan’s presentation at the July 16th meeting of our Denver Chapter. Inside, you will find information on a variety of MTArelated topics including new improvements in our CMT testing process, plus information on our new and improved technology platform called Net-Forum. We also present Part 1 of a three-part article on Swing Trading by money manager and author Dave Landry. I hope you enjoy it. John Kosar, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, August, 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-august-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-12 13:44:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-12 17:44:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52322 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 541287 [post_id] => 52322 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_1_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"52100";} ) [7] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52438 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2005-05-15 12:00:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-05-15 16:00:25 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

This month’s issue of Technically Speaking can be thought of as a supplement to the Education Seminar 2005 being held in New York. All of the articles are related to presentation being given at that event. For those unable to attend the Seminar, the articles should provide useful trading ideas. To contribute articles for possible publication in a future issue of this newsletter, please send your ideas to editor@mta.org. Cordially, Mike Carr, CMT Technically Speaking Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, May, 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-may-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-13 14:54:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-13 18:54:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52438 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 545329 [post_id] => 52438 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_1_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"52100";} ) [8] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52479 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2005-04-15 12:00:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-04-15 16:00:01 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

In this issue, Jim Balchunas, CMT, provides an excellent example of technical analysis. He has applied classical techniques to develop actionable trading plans for long-term investors. This is an excellent example of the type of work we wish we could publish more of in Technically Speaking. Unfortunately, we rarely receive such insightful analysis to consider for publication. This is your newsletter, and its success is very much dependant upon the membership for content. Book reviews, software reviews and market analysis are always welcome. Many of you produce short pieces as part of your job – please consider submitting them for publication here after your clients have seen them. For those seeking employment in the field, being published here is valuable input on a resume. And for those with their own firms, being featured in a professional publication is something that might just impress a potential client. The focus of this newsletter is also on MTA business, and this month that business is largely the upcoming Education Seminar. As John Kosar points out in this issue, the seminar has long been mix of technical analysis and camaraderie. If you’re still considering whether or not to attend, any prior attendee could tell you that it is well worth the time. Hope to see you there. Cordially, Mike Carr, CMT Technically Speaking Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, April, 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-april-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-14 13:08:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-14 17:08:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52479 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 546618 [post_id] => 52479 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_1_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"52100";} ) [9] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52497 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2005-03-15 12:00:13 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-03-15 17:00:13 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

This month’s newsletter is the largest that we have published in recent memory. There are two reasons for that - the Seminar announcement and the incredible contributions from the membership. The second half of the newsletter is devoted to providing complete details on the upcoming Seminar. The intent is to answer any question you may have and allow you to decide whether or not this event is for you. I’m sure you’ll agree with me that this event is for anyone with an interest in the markets. Even without the seminar announcement, we would have a very large newsletter thanks to groundbreaking articles submitted by our own members and affiliates. This newsletter is a great opportunity to publish short pieces of research. Although it is not necessary to write in accordance with the scholarly standards of the Journal of Technical Analysis, we will gladly accept thoroughly tested ideas that can help fellow traders profit. Frank Testa provided an article on a new point-and-figure technique and Eric Davidson wrote about a practical means of attaining a disciplined approach to trading. We also have reproduced two pieces of research by Arthur Merrill, CMT, who passed away in January, with the assistance of John McGinley, CMT. We hope you enjoy this issue, and look forward to seeing many of you in New York. If you will be attending the seminar and would like to talk about a newsletter article, please let me know. I would be happy to sit with you and complete an interview or summarize your ideas on technical analysis. Cordially, Mike Carr, CMT Technically Speaking Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, March, 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-march-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-14 14:26:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-14 18:26:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52497 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 547146 [post_id] => 52497 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_1_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"52100";} ) [10] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52524 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2005-02-15 12:00:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-02-15 17:00:44 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

Last month’s newsletter included an article by William Sarubbi, MBA, CMT entitled, “First-ofthe-Month Bias Continued.” This short research piece updated some work originally done by Arthur Merrill, CMT. Shortly after that issue was sent to the publisher, Arthur Merrill passed away. We are fortunate that he left us with a lifetime of work to update, and due to the statistical rigor he applied to indicators, we should expect to find that his work is just as valid today as it was when he undertook his efforts. In this month’s newsletter, we present some  insight to the great life Arthur lived. Next month, we hope to be able to publish a very small amount of his original work. Arthur tested more ideas than most of us will have in our lifetimes. Robert Colby, CMT, is an authority on indicators, having written an extremely detailed book on the subject, The Encyclopedia of Technical Market Indicators. In that book, Arthur Merrill is cited 23 times in the index, more than twice as often as any other individual, and second only to Ned Davis Research, an entire company dedicated to market research. We also have a summary of the recent brainstorming session in San Diego and a biography of Garfield Drew along with examples of several indicators and their applications to the stock market. We hope you enjoy this issue. Cordially, Mike Carr, CMT Technically Speaking Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, February, 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-february-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-17 13:06:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-17 17:06:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52524 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 548366 [post_id] => 52524 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_1_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"52100";} ) [11] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52526 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2005-01-15 12:00:13 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-01-15 17:00:13 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

As former “Technically Speaking” Editor Mike Kahn wrote in the July/August 2001 issue, “...my big farewell as editor of ‘Technically Speaking’ was a tad premature last month...” By now, you all know that the Board of Directors met in Woodbridge over the weekend before Christmas and is determined to build on the greatness of the MTA to create a more professional organization on our behalf. This newsletter can assist the Board in communicating with the members, and we, the membership, can communicate with the Board. I’d like to be a part of the solution, and will be working with the Board of Directors over the remainder of their terms to ensure that we hand off a first rate newsletter to next year’s leadership. In future months, Board members will share their thoughts on the MTA, summarize their accomplishments and detail their plans within the pages of “Technically Speaking.” Members are also being offered an opportunity to share their thoughts within these pages. Articles about any aspect of technical analysis are always welcome. Also welcome are Letters to the Editor praising or pummeling the MTA. Whether favorable or not, ALL letters will receive fair consideration for publication. In fact, letters of dissent will be given top priority. The only requirement is that solutions must be proposed to any problems identified. I hope that you find this month’s issue informative. We’ve included several articles about technical analysis, along with some news about MTA business. Articles for the future would be greatly appreciated - next month we would like to highlight indicators and everyone is encouraged to submit a description of how they use their favorite indicator. Charts may also be submitted, although they are best printed with a white background and dark colored lines. Cordially, Mike Carr, CMT Technically Speaking Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, Janurary, 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-janurary-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-18 09:51:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-18 13:51:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52526 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 549225 [post_id] => 52526 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_0_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"52100";} ) )

Contributions