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Julie Dahlquist, Ph.D., CMT

Julie Dahlquist, Ph.D., CMT

Julie Dahlquist, Ph.D., CMT is Professor of Professional Practice in the Finance Department at Texas Christian University (TCU).  Previously, she served on the faculty in the business schools at University of Texas at San Antonio and at St. Mary’s University. Her teaching experience spans over three decades and includes undergraduate, graduate, and Executive MBA students in programs in Mexico, Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Belgium, Greece and South Korea.

Julie is the president of the Technical Analysis Educational Foundation which works with colleges and universities to include technical analysis as an integral part of their finance curriculum.  Her research has appeared in Financial Analysts Journal, Managerial Finance, Applied Economics, Working Money, Financial Practices and Education, and the Journal of Financial Education. She has served as editor of the Journal of Technical Analysis and on the editorial board of the Southwestern Business Administration Journal, as well as a reviewer for a number of other journals.

Julie has co-authored Technical Analysis: The Complete Resource for Financial Market Technicians with Charles Kirkpatrick and two books:  Technical Analysis of Gaps and Technical Market Indicators: Analysis and Performance with Richard Bauer.  She is the recipient of the Charles H. Dow Award for research in technical analysis and the Mike Epstein Award for promoting technical analysis in academia.

Julie graduated from the University of Louisiana at Monroe with a B.B.A. with major in economics, summa cum laude. She received her M.A. in theology from St. Mary’s University and her Ph.D. in economics from Texas A&M University.

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            [post_content] => This month marks the one-year anniversary of the start of the 2020 market debacle. Think about how far we’ve all come since then: new highs, economic recovery, light at the end of the COVID tunnel and plenty of other things. We mourn for those we’ve lost and look forward to when our daily activities can return to normal.

What the pandemic may have done is accelerate trends in innovation and massive changes in how we work and play. Think about that when you fire up your Sony Betamax and Palm Pilot. Does your computer have a floppy disc drive? It may not even have a CD drive, anymore.

To quote an old French proverb, “the more things change, the more they stay the same.” The point is that the economy is always changing and industries come into and out of favor. So does debt. And hard assets. And entertainment. And travel. And real estate. You get the point. Don’t get stuck on yesterday’s trends. We are likely starting some huge ones now.

This month, we’ve dipped into the archives for a piece written by our own Dr. Julie Dahlquist many years ago. It talks about how there is good information in technical indicators. And, of course, it never hurts that it pokes a little fun at our economist colleagues.

And speaking of archives, there is one more photo from deep in the history of the Association. If you have any photos of seminars, speeches, winter retreats or just at the bar with fellow technicians, please send them along. We lost many great photos when our office in the Twin Towers came down on 9/11.

This month’s member interview is with Association Vice President Brett Villaume. And our president, Scott Richter, addresses how technical analysis helped him and his firm navigate the frothy waters of the recent short squeeze-a-palooza. Also, while a little delayed, this month’s chapter summary from Hong Kong presents the most thorough account of their December speakers. For those of us in an American mindset, the focus was on Asian markets, so consider that a treat.

Top it off with Association news and a link to the second offering in our new podcast series, “Fill the Gap,” and some recognition of recent member award winners across the globe.

Don’t forget, we can always use content. How about exercising your writing chops and sending in something about how you analyze the markets or how the Association has made your professional life better? No forecasts, please.

Michael Kahn, CMT

Editor
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            [post_content] => So far, this year has been dominated by the partial government shutdown. Does it affect the markets? Well, maybe indirectly. New issue IPOs are held up due to a lack of resources at the regulators. Tax refunds may be delayed, so investors might be a little cash tight. And most important of all, the shutdown and specter of a second downgrade of U.S. sovereign debt looms large. The deadline to raise or suspend the debt ceiling is just weeks away.

Volatility in stocks remains high, bitcoin seems to be fading from interest, and for the first time in a long while gold shows signs of life. Naturally, the flattish yield curve, Brexit, and slowing global growth made the pundits warn of gloom and doom. Don’t tell Mr. Dow and Ms. Nazzie (or their Brazilian cousin Bovie).

This month, the theme here centers on jobs. No, not jobs in the general economy, but jobs for technicians. We surveyed a group of technicians who took the plunge and went out on their own. After all, the number of direct, salaried jobs on the Street has dwindled - we’ve also got an article about a TA veteran who made that very point and told us what he did about it. The bottom line is that technical analysis is a very valuable skill to have, and where there’s a will, there’s a way to use it to make a living.

Next, Dan Russo, CMT, offers his views on risk management, which is a very important topic for all of us.

Of course, we’ve got news from around the association with chapter reports, CMT information, this month’s interview with George Schade, CMT and a review of the Mike Epstein Award presentation to Dave Lundgren, CMT, CFA by Julie Dahlquist, Ph.D., CMT.

- Michael Kahn, CMT
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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Many publications are dedicating January issues to a look at the year that was or a forecast for the year that is to be. We decided to ignore time and in this issue of Technically Speaking we review timeless techniques. Gaps, for example, have been a part of charts for hundreds of years and will always be visible on charts. This month, we review the Dow Award-winning paper written by Julie R. Dahlquist, PH.D., CMT and Richard J. Bauer, JR., PH.D., that explains how to trade gaps. Relative strength (RS) is also a technique that has worked for decades and is likely to continue providing useful trade signals in the future. John Lewis, CMT, from Dorsey Wright & Associates, expands on how RS can be applied to generate profits. Looking a little bit ahead, Tom Dorsey, co-founder of Dorsey Wright & Associates, will have more insights into successful strategies at the MTA Symposium in March. Bloomberg recently highlighted a useful application of the relative strength index (RSI) in Bloomberg Briefs and a summary of that information is presented here. Andrew Thrasher, CMT, then explains how copper has been replaced by semis in the modern economy as a stock market indicator. While trend lines have been useful in the past and will be useful in the future, Greg Schnell, CMT, demonstrates that they can be applied incorrectly. In an article that does provide a specific forecast for 2015, Mark Ungewitter uses timeless techniques like the Dow/Gold ratio, cycles, market breadth and the Coppock Curve to look at the stock market. Although we try to provide articles that will interest everyone, if we aren’t featuring a topic you find interesting, please let us know what you’d like to see more of by emailing us at editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, January 2015 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-january-2015 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:30:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:30:28 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=44513 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 365911 [post_id] => 44513 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_0_contributor [meta_value] => a:2:{i:0;s:4:"1730";i:1;s:4:"1099";} ) [3] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 47185 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2011-07-15 12:00:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-15 16:00:45 [post_content] =>

Letter from the Editor

This issue contains a few more summaries of MTA Symposium speaker presentations. There were two other presentations that no one should miss, but are in some ways too important to offer in summary form. The Technician’s Technician Panel brought together the technical analysts employed by the largest firms. Jordan Kotick, CMT, Managing Director and Head of Technical Trading Strategy for Barclays Capital, led the discussion and shared the stage with: While their market views and favorite techniques differ, all of these esteemed analysts share one opinion. They agreed that technical analysis is in a bull market and opportunities are more plentiful than ever in this field. Always popular, the Market Forecast Panel brings several distinguished technicians together to discuss what they see in the markets and how they think the future will unfold. Rather than trying to present the views of Ralph Acampora, Dr. Hank Pruden, Ken Tower and Chris Cady into simple bullish or bearish calls, the video of this discussion should be watched in full. What is most important is the thought process that some of the greatest minds in technical analysis apply to formulate their opinions. Each uses a different approach, and each has attained a great deal of success with their technique. As we work on future issues, we would like to hear what is important to you, our readers. Please let me know what you’d like to see in upcoming issues. The MTA Directory lists my phone number, or email editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Mike Carr, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, July 2011 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-july-2011 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-10 21:52:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-11 01:52:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=47185 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 409322 [post_id] => 47185 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_4_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"1730";} ) [4] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 48451 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2008-01-15 12:00:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2008-01-15 17:00:07 [post_content] =>

From the Editor

This year marks my tenth year of involvement in MTA activities. Within months of becoming an Affiliate, I asked if I could help with the newsletter. Mike Kahn, then the editor, agreed to give me an opportunity, and that single email exchange helped me to become a market professional and CMT. I feel that writing for the newsletter was the best study tool available for CMT preparation. There are twenty committees in the MTA, and I have served on eight of them and been involved with two regional chapters. With all of those activities, the newsletter has taught me the most and allowed me to develop more technical skills than any other. But, those other commitments require time, and I need to find more of that precious commodity to  effectively serve the MTA. To do that, we need a new editor of this newsletter. The job takes about 20 hours a month, on average. Someone with excellent time management skills might be able top schedule an hour a day – that was not my experience as I usually spent all the time over several days at the last minute each month. If you are interested in helping the MTA by taking over as editor of technically speaking, please send me a note (mraketstrategist@gmail.com). We will work a smooth transition, so that you will not suffer through a steep learning curve. And, the reality is that Tim Licitra does all the hard work required to create a nice document. Sincerely, Mike Carr, CMT Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, January / February 2008 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-january-february-2008 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-24 20:09:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-25 00:09:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=48451 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 434494 [post_id] => 48451 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_2_contributor [meta_value] => a:3:{i:0;s:4:"7251";i:1;s:4:"1121";i:2;s:4:"1730";} ) )

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