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Ken Tower, CMT

Ken Tower, CMT

Ken Tower, who holds the Chartered Market Technician (CMT) designation, is the CEO of Quantitative Analysis Service, Inc (QAS). Ken joined QAS in 2008 after a brief foray into asset management and five years as chief market strategist with Charles Schwab & Company’s CyberTrader Inc. unit, returning to the realm of institutional research where he spent the first 20 years of his career. QAS has, for over 40 years, analyzed financial markets using behavioral, technical, and quantitative tools in support of hedge fund and portfolio managers with our rules-based momentum system. We also use our system to create models that are used by both hedge funds and available to RIAs on the Global View platform.

Ken has appeared in well-known financial media outlets, including Bloomberg TV, CNBC, and MarketWatch Radio on many occasions, as well as in a variety of newspapers including the Wall Street Journal, Barron’s, and the New York Times. He has had articles published in the Journal of Technical Analysis along with Active Trader, SFO, and Stocks and Commodities magazines, and has guest-lectured on technical analysis topics extensively.

Ken is a former president of the CMT Association and currently serves on the Advisory Panel of the Technical Analysis Educational Foundation. He earned his CMT charter in 1991 and was part of the CMT Association’s 2004 presentation team that resulted in the FINRA decision to recognize the passage of CMT exam levels I and II as a Series 86 exemption as they do with CFA levels I and II. He has been a guest speaker at numerous CMT Association Seminars and Chapter meetings, and received the CMT Association’s Best of the Best award for Point and Figure charting on behalf of his research team. His point and figure work is cited in John Murphy’s bestselling Technical Analysis of the Financial Markets, Jeremy du Plessis’ The Definitive Guide to Point and Figure, and he has a chapter in New Thinking in Technical Analysis.

 

 

 

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            [post_content] => The joke running around the Internet is that this 2020 Leap Year had 29 days in February, 300 days in March and five years in April. It is already a year of biblical proportions, with locusts swarming in Africa, the global plague of COVID-19, and then murder hornets arriving in Washington state. The foot of snow that fell in the Northeast on May 8 seemed mild, but we can just wonder if June is thinking, “hold my beer.”

Yes, it is a different world. Millions are out of work, yet the stock market is on the road to recovery. I hold my tongue when my online friends wonder how that could be. It brings me to a quote from former Association president Phil Roth, who said, “The biggest mistake a fundamental analyst makes is thinking a stock and a company are the same thing. The biggest mistake a technical analyst makes is thinking they are different.”

But wait! There’s more!

Let’s not forget that crude oil traded at negative numbers in April thanks to the destruction of demand in the pandemic and so much supply that there was literally no place to put it. And the government is flooding the market with so much liquidity that negative interest rates seem to be a given in the U.S., as they already are across Europe and the world. The Fed wants to buy junk bonds, for crying out loud!

But again, in a world where many businesses were mandated to close, that fortunately does not apply to most of us in the Association. Our businesses can exist in a no-touch world. And it is our responsibility to keep going, and to be thankful.

In this month’s issue, we are thankful for the time spent with several technicians who have passed away. Tony Tabell, the second Association president is memorialized by Ken Tower, who worked for him long ago. Kenneth Safian, a long-time member and contributor also left us, as did Jim Schmidt, publisher of Timer Digest.

The CMT Association's own Barbara Terry has a great story about the initiative between the CMT Association and the CFA Association in Minnesota to fight hunger.

Also in Minnesota, that Chapter held its first virtual meeting with speaker Mark Newton, CMT.

This month’s member interview is with Jim Erdmier, CMT, co-chair of the Chicago Chapter. We acknowledge members who were finalists and winners in their categories at the Technical Analyst (magazine) Awards. And, of course, we’ve got a few encouraging words from the CMT Association president and other Association news as we continue to mint fresh new CMTs.

Lockdown, schmockdown! The CMT Association is open for business!

Michael Kahn, CMT

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            [post_content] => As the leaves finally turn here in the New York area, the stock market has once again reached new highs, at least according to the big indices. But just when you stopped looking, the Russell clawed back to the top of its year-long range and the NYSE composite – the average Joe index – is at a two-year high.

Could it be that the converse to “sell in May” is finally going to work? The answer is, of course, who knows?  The usual suspects still hold us hostage: China and the Fed. The latter seems to be on hold after the last rate hike.

There are a few things of note, namely the resurgence of retail stocks and banks. The dollar may be breaking down, too. Copper may still be comatose, but look at platinum soar!

This month in Technically Speaking, we’ve got part two of Bruno DiGiorgi’s History of Wall Street and a twist on an old, less-well-known indicator by David Steckler. New York and Minnesota Chapters weigh in with speaker reviews, and our member interview is with Ken Tower, CMT, a past president of the Association.

We’ve also got a similar interview with CMT Association Executive Director Alvin Kressler. It is easy to think of him as just an administrator, but when you look at his career, he is truly one of us.

Of course, we’ve got Association news, including the announcement of 27 new CMTs.

If you’ve got a book out, let us know so we can tell everyone. Also, if you are hiring technicians, we can post that here.

And as usual, I ask members to submit articles they’ve written (not forecasts but methods) or write something new to share your knowledge with the group. If you are new, this is a great way to develop your chops as an analyst and a writer.

Michael Kahn, CMT

Editor
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Letter from the Editor

This issue covers several basics of technical analysis. It’s often helpful to step back from the complexity we create in our field and review the time tested ideas that technical analysis has been built on. George Schade, CMT, offers a historical perspective on the widely used stochastic oscillator. He has painstakingly researched the origin of this indicator and shows us how it was developed and explains the history of the indicator. We often forget that there was time before computers and data was difficult to obtain, and very expensive when it was found. This article takes us back in time to those simpler times, which in many ways required deeper market analysis and a greater understanding of how prices moved. Phil Roth, CMT, details his recent experience of teaching technical analysis at a university. Phil is a major contributor to the course developed by the MTA Educational Foundation, and those wanting to learn more about the Foundation’s work can stop by their workshop at the Annual Symposium, or they can contact the Foundation directly. The ready-made course is a comprehensive summary of technical analysis, and is a tribute to Phil and those he worked with on its development. I am hoping to meet many of our readers at the MTA Symposium this month. My opinion is that this annual event is one of the most valuable benefits of membership, and judging from the fact that the event has sold out, I am not alone in that assessment. Please let me know when we meet what articles you’d like to see in upcoming issues of the newsletter, or email me at editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Mike Carr, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, May 2011 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-may-2011 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-11 16:41:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-11 20:41:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=47227 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 410552 [post_id] => 47227 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_4_contributor [meta_value] => a:2:{i:0;s:4:"1048";i:1;s:5:"43131";} ) [3] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 48165 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2008-12-15 12:00:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2008-12-15 17:00:35 [post_content] =>

Letter from the Editor

The content in this month’s newsletter is similar to what you’ve come to expect from us. We present very brief summaries of technical perspectives offered by expert technicians Ken Tower, Ken Winans, and Jeff Lay at a recent Trader’s Expo. A link to a video of the entire panel discussion is available on your member  homepage. Other articles include a couple book reviews and the Nominating Committee and Dow Award Committee have also provided important information. This issue of Technically Speaking represents the end of an era, and the beginning of a new one. It is the last one which will be delivered as a hard copy. Beginning in January 2009, we will be using electronic delivery to serve you better.  Initially we will be delivering the same information in a different format. Once a month, we will email a newsletter similar to the other electronic newsletters many of you now receive.  Links to each article will take you to the full text, and there will be an option to print anything you’d like to study in more detail. As soon as we can, we will add more timely updates. Interim emails will deliver short-term analysis. We will also be able to expand the quantity of material we deliver, including more reviews of books, software, and the latest products supporting technical analysts. We are excited about the changes that will come over the next few months. The quality of Technically Speaking will increase, and the value to you, the members, will be enhanced. Please feel free to offer any feedback to us as we craft your new newsletter. Email me at editor@mta.org with any ideas, requests, or articles you’d like to have published. Sincerely, Mike Carr, CMT Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, December 2008 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-december-2008 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-23 13:46:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-23 17:46:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=48165 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 428676 [post_id] => 48165 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_0_contributor [meta_value] => a:4:{i:0;s:4:"7251";i:1;s:4:"1048";i:2;s:3:"768";i:3;s:3:"967";} ) )

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