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Ralph Acampora, CMT

Ralph Acampora, CMT

Ralph Acampora, CMT is a pioneer in the development of market analytics. He has a global reputation as a market historian and a technical analyst, providing unique insights on market timing and related investment strategy issues to a wide audience within the financial industry. Ralph has been an instructor at the New York Institute of Finance for close to four decades, and previously served as the NYIF’s Director of Technical Analysis Studies. Before joining NYIF, he was Director of Technical Research at Knight Equity Markets.

Prior to joining Knight, he worked for 15 years at Prudential Equity Groups as its Director of Technical Analysis. Ralph is one of Wall Street’s most respected technical analysts and has been consistently ranked by Institutional Investor for more than ten years. He is regularly consulted for his opinion on market events by several major business news networks as well as national financial publications. He helped create the Chartered Market Technician designation and continues to advocate for its application in distinguishing practitioners of technical analysis.

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            [post_content] => As it is for so many people, especially those who worked in downtown Manhattan and the Pentagon, this month holds special meaning as it marks the 20th anniversary of the attacks on 9/11. As the Association, then known as the Market Technicians Association (MTA), had its headquarters in the North Tower of the World Trade Center, we were deeply affected. First and foremost, we had our own people in the building when the events unfolded. Fortunately, everyone working in the office was able to escape to safety. But we did suffer a huge loss as one of our members perished in the Tower collapse, and so did our office, along with our library and a good deal of our written history.



In this month’s edition, we have an updated version of the experience of Shelley Lebeck, our long-time office manager, from first feeling the building shake to her escape uptown. We also are re-running a piece written by Barbara Gomperts, our marketing consultant and production coordinator, about how the Association was able to bounce back so quickly. And Ralph Acampora relates his thoughts; he was President of the Association at the time. The point of all this is to show how the Association was dealt a huge blow, but was able to overcome it and continue to serve our members. That is the power of a membership community who cares and gets involved. Here is but one example: the late Bill Doane, who I thank daily for saving every edition of Technically Speaking, drove down from Boston with boxes of books from his own personal library as a gift to kickstart the library rebuild. Also, as luck would have it, I had a stash of MTA photos at home with me as I was putting together our tradeshow marketing booth. At least we had some of our visual history to seed new memories.

There are, of course, other things happening in the Association as we continue to move forward. This month’s member interview is with Ryan Detrick, CMT, who you may have seen many times on TV and Twitter, as he spreads the word on technical analysis. We’ve got news about the upcoming Asia Pacific Summit virtual event, as well as member news, information on the new Fill the Gap podcast episode and the announcement that our submission period is now open for the 2022 Charles H. Dow Award.

Be a part of this. Join a committee. Share your knowledge with the next generation of technicians. Even just attend the annual symposium. You will be glad you did.

This is the final edition of Technically Speaking in its current form. The Association is combining this newsletter with the Technical Insights newsletter, and I will be handing over the reins to Rashmi Shastry, CMT and the new team. Executive Director Alvin Kressler has more about this initiative below.

Michael Kahn, CMT

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            [post_content] => Spring has sprung in the northern climes, and as we start to return to more normal activities the stock market is still taking mighty gulps at the liquidity punchbowl provided by forever low interest rates and lots of government spending. How long can the market keep this up? That is for you and your charts to figure out. The real question, is how can we stay on top of things as they develop?

Last year, COVID stole our Annual Symposium but this year we are getting together virtually. Last autumn's India Summit kicked things off, and at the end of this month, we will have the Americas Summit. I know it is short notice in this newsletter, but since it is online, there are no travel needs, hotels, cabs, or taking off from work. See the announcement below.

This month, we acknowledge this year’s Charles H. Dow Award winner Makenna Barbara with a brief summary of the paper and this month’s interview. We also look back in Association history to the first discussions on getting the CMT designation the respect it deserves and the Series 86 Exemption for technicians. This was a very big deal. CMT co-founder Ralph Acampora takes us back to those discussions in 2004.

We’ve also got the CMT Annual Meeting coming up with elections for new officers and Board members. Association President Scott Richter sets that up in his monthly letter, and the full meeting agenda is published later in this edition.

Don’t forget Association goings-on and this month’s podcast episode featuring Jeff DeGraaf.

Also, we still want your old photos of seminars, meetings and even the old favorite annual seminars at the beach. Got a book to recommend? A new charting software package? We could use a volunteer to write an occasional book or software review, too.

Until next month!

Michael Kahn, CMT

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            [post_content] => With the vaccine roll-out in full swing, we can truly see the light at the end of the tunnel. For those of us in the colder Northern climates, the pending Spring is double good news since we’ve been cooped up inside our own homes. Who cannot wait to go to their favorite restaurant and not have to wear a parka?

The downside? Now we have to shed those pandemic pounds so we can wear more than sweat pants. I think I’ll take that.

Since mid-February, the markets have finally been interesting. Tech investors saw a “correction” while at the very same time portions of the rest of the market were at all-time highs. Gold is in the tank but oil is at multi-month highs. Remember last year when it went negative? Fun times – not. And have you seen copper?

Then, of course, there is all that debt out there. Liquidity … until the piper shows up for payment.

On a more somber note, over the past few weeks we’ve lost three great people and assets to the Association. Les Williams was a model of involvement, with participation and leadership in many areas in the Association over the years. Not only that, he was a genuinely nice guy and his signature adorns the CMT charter hanging on my wall. Bernadette Murphy, who was known to greater Wall Street as a leader for decades, was instrumental in legitimizing technical analysis as a true investment discipline. Younger members may not know of her, but they should. Memorials for both of these great people are in this month’s edition, and this month’s photo archive features a few shots of them. We've also got a brief tribute to Bill Sharp, co-founder and past President of the CSTA - the technical society in Canada.

This month’s member interview is with Michael Gayed CFA, who is a multiple winner of the Dow Award and awards from other groups. Walter Deemer, a now-retired technical analysis veteran, has put decades of his writings and analysis online for all to see. What was it like in the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s? Just read his comments.

He also happens to be the subject of this month’s Fill the Gap, the CMT Association's official podcast.

Of course, we have news from the Association, and President Scott Richter offers his thoughts about helping our colleagues out of any lingering career effects from the pandemic.

Don’t forget, you can submit articles for publication here. As long as they are about technical analysis or the business (not forecasts) we want to see them. Yes, even from brand new analysts. Write something. How do you think I, a physics major in college, got to be a columnist and editor? I wrote – a lot. Now it is your turn.

We want your photos, too. Book reviews, software reviews, thoughts on regulation, anything that members would find useful or interesting relating to technical analysis.

Michael Kahn, CMT

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            [post_content] => We are still talking about trade battles with China and an arguably inverted yield curve. Yes, there are other perennial thorns in the paw (Iran and North Korea) but they don’t have much market moving history. As June ended, we got a trade battle truce and the stock market soared. Imagine what will happen if something actually gets done!

I still have a problem with calling the yield curve inverted, as most of it is upward sloping. Only the three-month bill is out of whack as I write this on July 1 and that is rather tied to the Fed. Will they cut, or won’t they? Before the trade truce, fed funds trading had a rate cut for a certainty for this month. Now? Maybe not so certain.

What I can see that is problematic is that the entire curve shifted lower compared to a month ago. And a quick scan of some global debt shows a lot of fractional, and even negative, benchmark yields. All that cannot be good.

Yet gold is backing down to test its breakout. Again, I am writing on July 1 so you all will know how that went.

Bitcoin. Again. Technical analysts’ paradise, investors’ nightmare. When the prices for retro Air Jordans on the StockX sneaker exchange are more stable than the “currency of the future,” I like to watch from afar. The lyrics of Bob Dylan dance in my head – “When will they ever learn? When will they ev-er learn?”

This month, we have an interesting white paper excerpt from TrendSpider about their new raindrop charts. It attempts to give the TA a feeling for how the day or hour developed, similar to market profile, although chartable like candles. However, volume is incorporated as in a VWAP.

This month’s member interview is Les Williams, CMT, who has been active in the association for many years and in many roles. My own CMT certificate was signed by him when he was the Chair of the Admissions committee.

And the Millers are back with the fourth and final installment of their series on copyrights. Again, this is an important topic for anyone who publishes books, newsletters and even blogs.

We've got three Chapter speaker reviews from Atlanta, Denver and Minnesota. Our regular association member news. And a little career advice for newbies urging everyone to write, write, write, no matter how green you may be.

Michael Kahn, CMT
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From the Editor

Well, October certainly lived up to its spooky and quite volatile reputation. From leading momo tech stocks tanking to multiple multi-percentage point intraday moves everywhere else, I am sure antacid makers made a tidy profit. Of course, coffee, sugar and crude oil had their own action and did you see palladium’s all-time high? This is my second edition of the new Technically Speaking and once again I must ask for volunteers to help us deliver a well-rounded offering with: Drop us a line at editor@CMTAssociation.org. We welcome everyone, including newly minted members. In this edition, we offer another of our member interviews with Phil Roth, CMT, a legend in the field and one of the most generous members with his time. And if I have not hit you over the head enough about getting involved, I’m re-running a piece I did a while ago called “Thoughts on Volunteering.” We also have part 2 in a series that ran back in the 1990s called “Lessons from Dead Pilots,” written by Mark Eidem CMT, CFA, which gives a fascinating comparison with traders. And a report from Clint Sorenson, CMT, CFA on how an investment advisor incorporates technical analysis into an otherwise fundamentally-driven business. Rounding it all out will be news from around the association – chapters, strategy, CMT news and events. Michael Kahn, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, November 2018 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-november-2018 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:17:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:17:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=35979 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 239016 [post_id] => 35979 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_10_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:3:"904";} ) [5] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 34269 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2018-09-18 13:31:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-09-18 17:31:48 [post_content] =>

From the Editor

As Randy Quaid’s character said as he was about to slay the alien ship in Independence Day, “Hello boys – I’m baaack!” Hello boys and girls! After a 20-year hiatus, I am back at the helm of Technically Speaking. The good news is that unlike last time when it was just me, with the indomitable Barbara Gomperts handling production, we’ve got a full team handling the particulars, including gathering some of the content. Shout outs to Tyler Wood, Shane Skwarek, CMT Association CEO Alvin Kressler and the staff for all the help. The biggest change you will notice is that we’ve taken Technically Speaking back to a more traditional association newsletter where we focus on you, the member, and how the CMT Association can help you in your careers. Kudos to Mike Carr, CMT for his stewardship over the past few years. That was a flashback for me, because the last time I was editor, I relied on Mike for all sorts of content. Maybe we can twist his arm again! Aside from bringing you your association news, this inaugural newsletter is also a call to arms for members and associates. We need volunteers to help us deliver a well-rounded offering with: With that said, we’ll kick of the member interview series with the Godfather, Ralph Acampora, CMT, one of the founders of the CMT Association. We also have part 1 in a series that ran back in the 1990s called “Lessons from Dead Pilots,” written by Mark Eidem CMT, CFA, which gives a fascinating comparison with traders. And a big thank-you to Vincent M. Randazzo, CMT and the team at Lowry’s Research for their take on the advance-decline line. Rounding it all out will be news from around the association – committees, strategy, CMT news and events. Let us know what you think! Michael Kahn, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, September 2018 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => september-2018 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:19:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:19:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=34269 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 214529 [post_id] => 34269 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_4_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:3:"904";} ) [6] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 45224 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2014-01-15 12:00:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-01-15 17:00:57 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

This month’s newsletter begins with an article that covers the past and the present. Ralph Acampora, CMT, was present at the beginning of the MTA and has been a part of every major development in the organization during the past 40 years. He looks forward to the next 40 years of the MTA and expects much to change over that time. However, he also expects some things to remain as they are. Ralph, like so many others, expects the MTA to continue to be a professional organization where ideas are freely shared. The MTA will continue advancing the profession of technical analysis on Wall Street. In addition to taking a long-term look into the future, we are also looking just a few months ahead in this issue. Although it is only January, the planning for this year’s Annual Symposium is well underway. In this month’s issue of Technically Speaking we are offering insights from two of the scheduled speakers, Perry Kaufman and John Murphy, CMT. We hope that you will be planning to attend the Symposium and to participate in your local MTA Chapter in the coming year. We also hope you will share your work through the newsletter. Submissions can be sent at any time to editor@mta.org. Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, January 2014 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-january-2014 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:31:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:31:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=45224 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 378319 [post_id] => 45224 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_1_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:3:"904";} ) [7] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 46561 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-05-15 12:00:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-05-15 16:00:47 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

As an organization, the MTA has a strong sense of history. One of the ways the MTA chronicles the history of technical analysis and the organization is through its Annual Awards program. Individuals from the past who have made contributions to the field are honored at the Annual Symposium. This year, six individuals were commended for their work and we present small summaries of their accomplishments. We also include history in this newsletter as often as possible. This month, we conclude with a summary of the Darvas Box, a trading technique developed by Nicolas Darvas. Although better known as a dancer than a market analyst, Darvas wrote a New York Times Best Seller in the late 1950s that highlighted the value of technical analysis to the public. Technicians working with screening software can easily automate his approach instead of relying on weekly issues of Barron’s as Darvas did more than fifty years ago. This issue also offers an extract of a recent academic paper that discusses some of the topics that are explained poorly in finance textbooks. This material could help some who are trying to explain the benefits of technical analysis to academics. Beta and the equity risk premium may be ill defined, yet cornerstones of pricing theories. Technical analysis offers an adaptive approach to investment theory and could be more useful in real-world trading than concepts like that. As always, we enjoy learning what you think about Technically Speaking. Please email us at editor@mta.org. Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, May 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-may-2012 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:35:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:35:17 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=46561 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 399424 [post_id] => 46561 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_2_contributor [meta_value] => a:2:{i:0;s:3:"904";i:1;s:5:"43131";} ) [8] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 46756 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-01-15 12:00:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-01-15 17:00:23 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

We are starting the New Year for the newsletter by offering you a variety of topics. Hopefully we are reflecting the wide variety of work members of the MTA are doing in the real world. Celebrating the New Year involves a number of traditions and applying technical analysis is also rooted in a number of traditional tools, many of which are updated and applied in unique ways. We feature the work of Eric Leake and John Kosar, CMT, showing how they are applying traditional tools to create valuable forecasts. Jeb Handwerger applies these types of tools to a market that isn’t widely followed, rare earth metals, but is in the news quite frequently. Ken Safian has long been applying traditional tools in an untraditional way to economic data in addition to following the stock markets with a technical-based approach. We also highlight a new book from Christopher Grafton, CMT, which explains a traditional tool, cycles, in a new way. Please let us know what you are doing and allow us to share your application of the tools of technical analysis to the readers of Technically Speaking by sending an email to editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Mike Carr, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, January 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-january-2012 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-25 13:21:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-25 17:21:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=46756 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 402414 [post_id] => 46756 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_7_contributor [meta_value] => a:3:{i:0;s:4:"2390";i:1;s:3:"904";i:2;s:3:"962";} ) [9] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 48627 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2007-08-15 12:00:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2007-08-15 16:00:38 [post_content] => * Due to time sensitive submissions there will not be a letter from the Executive Director or Editor this month. * [post_title] => Technically Speaking, August 2007 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-august-2007 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-26 12:15:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-26 16:15:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=48627 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 442368 [post_id] => 48627 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_4_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:3:"904";} ) [10] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 48698 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2007-04-15 12:00:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2007-04-15 16:00:34 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

In recent months, this newsletter has included articles about volunteering and highlighted the benefits you’ll see from being involved. Michael Kahn, Fred Meissner and Larry Berman have written about how much they enjoyed being involved in the MTA. These three talented individuals would have doubtlessly succeeded in this business even without the MTA. But, I certainly would not have been able to attain my career goals without the MTA. A month after I joined the MTA, nearly ten years ago, Michael Kahn, then-editor of Technically Speaking, allowed me to prepare one page summaries of the New York MTA meetings. Each month, I forced myself to learn enough about the speaker’s area of expertise to write a concise review, making me a better technician. I would not have passed my CMT tests without this exposure to all aspects of technical analysis. Another benefit of this writing came when the newsletter arrived in my mailbox each month, and I analyzed each of Michael’s helpful edits. If you’re reading this, Michael, thanks for making me a better writer. Eventually, I became your editor, and that has allowed me to call and email many of you to see if you can submit something. If I haven’t gotten to you yet, please feel free to send me your articles at any time. I have also had the opportunity to serve on the Nominating Committee and the Journal Committee. Committee work requires a small amount of time and a great deal of interaction with fellow members. In other words, I’ve enjoyed talking to the best and brightest in the field and learned an incredible amount by listening to their decades of accumulated wisdom. I firmly believe that experience is the best teacher. I have just found that sometimes it’s less expensive to learn from someone else’s experience. My involvement in the MTA has allowed me to learn from the experience of true giants in the field of technical analysis. I urge you to look at what you can do within our organization. The MTA will be stronger with your help, and you’ll grow as a technician through your work alongside fellow volunteers. Sincerely, Mike Carr, CMT Editor, Technically Speaking [post_title] => Technically Speaking, April 2007 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-april-2007 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-26 17:05:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-26 21:05:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=48698 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 443585 [post_id] => 48698 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_2_contributor [meta_value] => a:2:{i:0;s:5:"48405";i:1;s:3:"904";} ) [11] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 48706 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2007-03-15 12:00:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2007-03-15 16:00:09 [post_content] =>

From the Executive’s Desk

The primary objective of any successful Association is to ensure its membership receives value. The MTA is off to an excellent start in 2007 to providing that value. Over the course of the last month, the MTA has provided free seminars to its membership on the following topics: In addition, through a combination of collaborative agreements with trade publishers, additional MTA purchases and ongoing donations from Members, we have considerably added to the depth and current nature of our library material. See some of the new additions in this publication or check in the library section of our MTA.org website. And, of course, we continue to provide local chapter meetings (with an increasing number on our website, our annual Journal and our monthly Newletters. In this publication you will see information from 3 MTA Presidents - Current President Phil Roth, CMT, Former President Ralph Acampora, CMT, and Former President Phil Erlanger, CMT. Finally, we are in the process of planning for the May Annual Education Seminar, which will take place on May 18-19th in NYC. We are planning an Education Track and Advanced Lecture Track, a market forecast panel, etc. with some of the industry’s most notable speakers. Be on the lookout for information regarding this seminar and please join us. I am confident it will be a worthwhile event for all who attend. Sincerely, Tom Silveri MTA Executive Director [post_title] => Technically Speaking, March 2007 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-march-2007 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-26 19:26:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-26 23:26:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=48706 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 443838 [post_id] => 48706 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_4_contributor [meta_value] => a:2:{i:0;s:5:"48405";i:1;s:3:"904";} ) [12] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52283 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2005-10-15 12:00:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-10-15 16:00:55 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

As I write this, the commentators on financial television are working themselves into a frenzy as the S&P 500 has just declined below its 200-day moving average for the first time since early July. The index’s negotiation of this widely-watched major trend proxy characterizes the indecision in the financial markets right now as the marketplace ponders the economic effects of two hurricanes that recently destroyed the US gulf coast. Our cover article by Thomas Neuhaus discusses this very topic: the market’s historic reaction to natural disasters. It is both timely and interesting.  Inside, Contributing Editor Garry Rissman has provided us with the dialogue and some great photos from the question and answer session of the the MTA’s 2005 Market Forecast Panel held at the American Management Association headquarters on September 12th in New York City. Panelists included Gail Dudack, CMT, Katie Townshend, CMT, Louise Yamada, CMT, and Jeanette Schwartz Young, CFP, CMT. Also inside, Chicago Chapter Chair Ross Leinweber reports on the August 31st regional meeting in Chicago that featured Buff Dormeier, CMT’s discussion of volume as a confirmation tool. Finally, in the last of a three-part series of how-to articles by Dave Landry of Harvest Capital Management, Dave answers some frequently-asked questions about swing trading. One last reminder: Don’t forget to sign up for the MTA’s Second Annual Mid-Winter Retreat to be held on January 20th and 21st at the Four Points Sheraton in Miami Beach. Each session of this retreat will discuss technical analysis from a different professional perspective: that of the trader, the analyst and the portfolio manager. The relaxed format will also allow time for experienced technicians to sit down and share ideas with one another, which is often one of the most valuable and memorable parts of these events. Just being in Miami Beach in January can be pretty memorable, too. Hope you enjoy this month’s issue. John Kosar, CMT Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, October, 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-october-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-12 11:35:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-12 15:35:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52283 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 540355 [post_id] => 52283 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_7_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:3:"904";} ) [13] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52339 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2005-07-15 12:00:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-07-15 16:00:40 [post_content] =>

Technology Update

Right now my brain feels a little like it is made of mayonnaise. With Shelley Lebeck retiring, Marie moving into her role, Tom MacMahon’s position being eliminated (they have given their full cooperation to this effort) and two new people joining us soon, (one of them starts Tuesday) your MTA staff has been giving the full court press to our technology changeover.  The new technology platform will make it possible to serve the membership better and to know the history of member activity completely. With 149 pages of standard reports and the ability to track every contact from the membership and from prospects, this new tool will provide far more opportunities to the membership and facilitate MTA future growth on a world-wide basis. It will make the MTA a more virtual organization than we ever thought possible. However, no transition is ever as simple or straight forward as one would like it to be. Everything happens at once. With staff changes happening, it makes sense for current staff to have input for the history and for new staff to be trained on the new tool. I’m pleased to report that as of yesterday our input to Avectra to the initial data conversion is now complete. Next week we start looking at test data on the new MTA live platform. We are still shooting for a “go-live” date this fall. As we move toward that date, we will be asking everyone to validate your data on the website. Please stay tuned. We will provide more details of new features and benefits as they become available. Thank you, John R. Kirby Executive Director [post_title] => Technically Speaking, July, 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-july-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-12 14:23:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-12 18:23:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52339 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 542447 [post_id] => 52339 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_5_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:3:"904";} ) )

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