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Robert Dombrower, CMT

Robert Dombrower, CMT

Robert Dombrower is a Vice President and Senior Portfolio Specialist at Jackson National Asset Management in Denver, Colorado. Robert spearheads Jackson’s technical research effort through the creation and implementation of quantitative technical analysis overlays, qualitative research, top down and bottom up technical research, and intermarket analysis and forecasting.

Prior to joining Jackson, Robert was a Senior Vice President and portfolio manager at ICC Capital Management, now owned by Highland Capital. He published a long-running weekly research piece entitled “The Technical Take” that tracked the major macro technical themes in play across the global market landscape. Prior to ICC, Robert was a Quantitative Equity Portfolio Manager and Manager of Operations at Paradigm Asset Management Company in New York, where he team managed the large cap domestic equity strategies for the public, corporate and endowment arenas. He served on the Paradigm Investment Committee and was instrumental in the design and implementation of successful quantitative technical models across all equity classes. He also managed the operations effort at Paradigm by creating automated reconciliation and reporting efficiencies for the entire firm.

Robert began his financial career at Independence Investment Associates in Boston as a Portfolio Management Associate, where he managed the quantitative core strategy with assets totaling $28B. Robert holds the CMT charter and serves as Chairman of the Orlando Chapter. He is also a member of the Society of Quantitative Analysts. Robert holds a BA in English and Music (Phi Beta Kappa) from Binghamton University and an MM in Music from the Boston University School for the Arts.

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            [post_content] => Hello Readers!  

Wishing all of you a prosperous and healthy Diwali in advance. May this festival light up your lives, both personally and professionally! 

The recently concluded CMT 2020 India Virtual Summit was a great successWorld class speakers graced us with their virtual presenceand I can confidently say that there are decades of learnings in the recordings of these sessions that any analyst would benefit from immensely! A big thank you to all the Speakers and participants for making this Summit a memorable one. For all those who missed it, we have compiled some session descriptions and have dedicated this edition of the Newsletter to the Summit. There’s GOLD in these sessions, so do make sure that you go through them before the online video recordings expire on November 16, 2020!   

If you had already registered for the Summit, log back in to your digital event guide to access the recordings. If you hadn't registered for the Summit, you can register to view the recordings here https://cmtassociation.org/events/2020-india-regional-summit/

As a market participant, there are certain concepts that you learn through personal, rigorous study and certain concepts that you learn by simply being a part of the system. I recently came across interesting analogies in Sanskrit and found it quite relevant to us. 

Markata Kishor Nyayam: (Baby monkey principle/law) 

You must’ve noticed that the mother monkey moves swiftly from one branch to another while the baby monkey hangs on with a tight grip so as to not fall. Here, the baby focuses on the grip, while the mother focuses on movement alone.  

Marjaala Kishor Nyayam: (Baby cat principle/law) 

A mother cat carries its kitten in its mouth to move them to safety or to a different location. Here, the onus lies on the mother to make sure that she doesn’t drop or hurt the kitten while holding on to it with a delicate balance of grip and care. The kitten surrenders itself to the mother. 

As traders and analysts we spend countless hours understanding various aspects of the market by holding on to it with a tight grip, as it swings from bull cycles to bear cycles, just like a baby monkey holds on to its mother. There are also times when we understand concepts by being part of the market where the market guides us and helps us, just like a mother cat doesOne cannot always be as tenacious as a baby monkey or as laid back as a kitten. It is a combination of these two approaches that leads to a fulfilling understanding of a subject. 

In order to improve our trade, it is imperative to revisit the involuntary errors we make and work towards overcoming them together: 
  1. I will refrain from saying “I told you so” (this one is particularly difficult in our field) 
  2. I will not compare my Chapter 8 to someone else’s Chapter 20  
  3. I will not blame the market for my errors (this is just convenient. Why would the market single you out?)  
  4. will exit the trade once it has triggered my stop loss; not average it (aren’t all of us guilty of this at some point?) 
  5. I will identify patterns on charts without forcing them (if I just tweak the lines a little, I can make it look like a triangle…maybe) 
  6. I will focus on being unbiased (My way or the highway really doesn’t work here) 
These are some of my New Year resolutions. I figured I might as well get an early start. You are free to borrow and build on them!    Until the next time,   Rashmi Shastry, CMT [post_title] => Technical Insights - November 2020 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technical-insights-november-2020 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-11-09 15:53:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-11-09 20:53:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technical_insights&p=53436 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technical_insights [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 570955 [post_id] => 53436 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_4_contributor [meta_value] => a:4:{i:0;s:5:"53122";i:1;s:5:"26994";i:2;s:3:"787";i:3;s:5:"49833";} ) [1] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 45792 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2013-09-15 12:00:06 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-09-15 16:00:06 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Traders around the world are reacting to what they think the Federal Reserve might do in the coming months. Fed officials have repeatedly tried to calm the markets by explaining they have no firm plans for managing the end of their latest Quantitative Easing initiative. For some reason, traders seem to be nervous about assurances. No one really seems to know what will happen next. In this month’s newsletter, we have the insights of technicians from around the world. We are able to feature assessments of markets in the U.S., Canada, and the Philippines. We also have several charts showing the recent activity in India. Hopefully in the future we can provide analysis of markets in other countries. There are now MTA Members in 85 countries. We have no way of knowing where the next global hot spot will be but we can be fairly certain an MTA member will be providing analysis on that market. If you prepare reports on some of the less widely covered markets, or on the more popular markets, please consider them sharing them with the MTA through Technically Speaking. You can email us at editor@mta.org. Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, September 2013 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-september-2013 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:34:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:34:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=45792 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 388811 [post_id] => 45792 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_5_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:3:"787";} ) [2] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 45839 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2013-08-15 12:00:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-08-15 16:00:34 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

We are starting this month’s newsletter with an article that challenges the traditional models used to explain market prices. Dr. Ben Hunt argues that just as the heliocentric model of the solar system replaced a geocentric model over time, long-held beliefs about markets need to be reexamined and updated to reflect new knowledge. Fortunately, Dr. Hunt points out that there is a market theory which lays the groundwork for a new understanding of market:

“Technical analysis is, at its heart, behavioral analysis, and as such is prime real estate to build a new investment paradigm that incorporates game theoretic behaviors.”

This is a thought-provoking piece that is followed by a practical example of how the MTA Educational Foundation is working to further this goal. We then have practical examples of how the theory of technical analysis is applied in the real world. I hope you are a part of the theoretical and practical changes that are occurring in the financial community. If you would like to share your thoughts on those changes, please email us at editor@mta.org. Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, August 2013 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-august-2013 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:34:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:34:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=45839 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 389747 [post_id] => 45839 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_6_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:3:"787";} ) [3] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 47846 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2010-02-15 12:00:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-02-15 17:00:56 [post_content] =>

Letter from the Editor

In this month’s issue of Technically Speaking, we offer several short articles that could stimulate some fresh thoughts on the markets. John R. McGinley, CMT, offers details on a reliable January indicator. What is interesting about his work is that he includes a test of statistical significance, a step lacking in most articles written about technical indicators. We are also reprinting a very readable explanation of the chi squared test written John’s friend and mentor, the late Arthur Merrill, CMT. We follow this with some very specific trading lessons. Mike Moody, CMT, quantifies how much following a disciplined approach can be worth in “The $ Value of Patience.” Ken Winans, CMT, contributes an article which shows that simple strategies can work very well. David Penn of TradingMarkets.com also explains a specific trading strategy. Bob Palmerton, CMT, provides details on a disciplined way to look at the markets each day. Finally, we have some reviews of trading tools developed by MTA members. We are always happy to bring your work to the attention of others. Books can be reviewed as Adobe files so that the article can be published at the time the book is being formally released. Please email us at editor@mta.org to arrange for a review, or to contribute an article that will be read by thousands of MTA members and affiliates around the world. Sincerely, Mike Carr, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, February 2010 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-february-2010 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-20 14:28:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-20 18:28:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=47846 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 421660 [post_id] => 47846 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_6_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"47875";} ) )

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