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Scott Hathaway, CFTe

Scott Hathaway, CFTe

Scott Hathaway, CFTe is the Co-Founder and Manager of Pattern to Profit, LLC, a new independent technical investment research firm utilizing unique geometric analysis of global markets.

A musician by trade, Scott committed to the constant study, exploration and innovation of the charting of financial markets over 10 years ago. This re-direction involved explorations of the works of W.D. Gann, Michael Jenkins, and Tom DeMark, combined with a basic study of physics and geometry. During that time he developed a number of new methods and techniques of technical analysis that incorporate geometry, sine waves, parabolic structures, fractional angles, wave interference patterns, and predominantly, ‘Relative Charting.’ In this approach, price itself dictates the geometric basis, as opposed to conventional geometric charting, and thus offers a truly unique and internal perspective on the markets.

Scott presented at the 2013 IFTA Conference in San Francisco. His writings have been featured in Stocks & Commodities Magazine, Technically Speaking, TSAA-SF Quarterly, among other publications. The Hathaway tool kit featuring some of Scott’s methodologies is available on the Optuma charting platform by Market Analyst.

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

In this month’s issue, we are confident we have something for everyone.  Charlie Kirkpatrick, CMT, the only person to have written two Dow Award winning papers, explains an indicator he calls “the forward line.” In the first two articles of this issue, he explains the theory at the heart of the forward line, details the calculation of the indicator and demonstrates how to apply it to trading. In this month’s member interview, Anthony Abry explains his work and identifies position sizing and Commitment of Traders (COT) data as potential areas for further study. To help start your study, we turned to Ralph Vince who was the first to detail the theory of position sizing and John Kosar, CMT, who is one of the most innovative analysts working with COT data. We include some recent research from John and then added a chart showing how the market actually performed after John made his realtime market call.  We conclude this issue with an article about market geometry by Scott Hathaway. Scott has been working on new geometric techniques, in some ways picking up where and Gann and Elliott left off. Please let us know what topics you’d like to see covered in future issues by emailing us at editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, December 2014 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-december-2014 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:30:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:30:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=44585 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 367792 [post_id] => 44585 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_7_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"28566";} ) [1] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 44625 [post_author] => 35924 [post_date] => 2014-11-15 12:00:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-11-15 17:00:12 [post_content] =>

Letter From The Editor 

Many readers already know that Fred Dickson, CMT, passed away at the end of October.  In this issue, we look at an example of his work. It is an amazing example of clarity and focus and provides an example of how to turn ideas into actions.  Fred dedicated much of his life to helping others turn ideas into actions. As with most great individuals, outstanding professional accomplishments are just one small part of their life.  Gail Dudack, CMT, notes, "Fred was probably the smartest and most gentile person i have known.  And while he had a great reputation on Wall Street and CNBC, his true passion was counseling people who needed help and he did this for decades as deacon of his church.  He was always there if you needed him.  But his greatest passion was his harem: wife Linda, daughters Kathy and Barbara." Fred also played a significant role in turning the ideas of technical analysis into a respected profession.  It is impossible to overstate the impact Fred had on the MTA.  He became a member in September 1978 and served as president from 1983 tom 1984.  Fred earned his CMT designation in April 1991. Ralph Acampora, CMT, credits Fred with kick starting the CMT program.  Ralph noted that Fred personally wrote the first 300 questions for the exam.  Ralph also recalled that there was a period of time when the MTA Library was homeless and Fred stepped in to keep the library functioning.  Along with his wife, Linda, Fred moved the books to his garage and made them available to members while the MTA looked for a new home. In all likelihood, Fred would prefer that we take inspiration from his life rather than isolated memories.  Even if never had the opportunity to meet Fred, consider Gail Dudack's comments as a summary of his personality and consider Ralph's recollections as a summary of his commitment to his profession.  We can all find inspiration in his life and acting on those inspirations would be the legacy Fred would desire and deserves. Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, November 2014 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-november-2014 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:30:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:30:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=44625 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 368660 [post_id] => 44625 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_10_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"28566";} ) [2] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 45839 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2013-08-15 12:00:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-08-15 16:00:34 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

We are starting this month’s newsletter with an article that challenges the traditional models used to explain market prices. Dr. Ben Hunt argues that just as the heliocentric model of the solar system replaced a geocentric model over time, long-held beliefs about markets need to be reexamined and updated to reflect new knowledge. Fortunately, Dr. Hunt points out that there is a market theory which lays the groundwork for a new understanding of market:

“Technical analysis is, at its heart, behavioral analysis, and as such is prime real estate to build a new investment paradigm that incorporates game theoretic behaviors.”

This is a thought-provoking piece that is followed by a practical example of how the MTA Educational Foundation is working to further this goal. We then have practical examples of how the theory of technical analysis is applied in the real world. I hope you are a part of the theoretical and practical changes that are occurring in the financial community. If you would like to share your thoughts on those changes, please email us at editor@mta.org. Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, August 2013 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-august-2013 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:34:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:34:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=45839 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 389494 [post_id] => 45839 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_2_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"28566";} ) [3] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 46143 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2013-03-15 12:00:06 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-03-15 16:00:06 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

The MTA has long recognized the value of diverse techniques in the field of technical analysis. In this month’s newsletter we try to live up to that tradition and present both visual and quantifiable approaches to analysis. We start with an overview of the career of John Bollinger, CFA, CMT. We then summarize the career of Susan Berger who has spent 45 years working in technical analysis (so far) using the techniques she learned from John Magee. It is fascinating to read how Susan did things when working with Magee. It is equally fascinating to think back at the advance that Bollinger Bands represented when they were introduced about 15 years into Susan’s career. Chart paper and grids for calculating indicators were being replaced by personal computers in the 1980’s and John Bollinger was among the first to recognize that new environment. He introduced an indicator that would have been unthinkably complex to implement in the 1970’s. Several newer techniques are also featured in articles by Scott Hathaway and Alan Hall who works with Dr. Robert Pechter, Jr., CMT, at the Socionomics Institute. Dr. Prechter will be sharing his latest work at the MTA Symposium in a few weeks along with a number of other speakers. The Symposium will truly be a showcase for the diverse techniques of technical analysis as an amazing group of experts share their research and experience. As always, we would appreciate receiving any comments you have on the newsletter, which can be emailed to editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, March 2013 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-march-2013 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:34:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:34:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=46143 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 394520 [post_id] => 46143 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_9_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"28566";} ) [4] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 46191 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2013-02-15 12:00:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-02-15 17:00:12 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

In February, the MTA is recognizing Women in Finance and will be featuring webcasts by experts in technical analysis who also happen to be women. We have tried to recognize the contributions some women have made to technical analysis in this issue of Technically Speaking. The MTA has a long history of recognizing the role of women in finance including Bernadette Murphy, CMT, who served as the fifth president of the organization in 1977. We also briefly highlight the work of another past President, Gail Dudack, CMT, in this month’s newsletter along with brief articles about the work of Louise Yamada, CMT and Jeanette Schwarz Young, CFP, CMT. While celebrating the fortieth anniversary of the MTA, it is interesting to note that the MTA has always focused on “attract(ing) and retain(ing) a membership of professionals devoting their efforts to using and expanding the field of technical analysis and sharing their body of knowledge with their fellow members.” Those words in found in the MTA constitution and history shows that women just happen to have been among the leading contributors to the body of knowledge over the years. We would appreciate receiving any comments you have on the newsletter, which can be emailed to editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, February 2013 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-february-2013 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:34:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:34:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=46191 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 395298 [post_id] => 46191 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_6_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"28566";} ) [5] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 46361 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-10-15 12:00:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-10-15 16:00:49 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Once again, we have tried to present a broad array of work in technical analysis to you in this month’s issue. Eric Leake uses economic news and interest rates to discuss the outlook for high yield bonds. Scott Hathaway applies geometric techniques to the gold market.  Larry Berman, CMT, CFA, CTA, and Keith Richards, CMT, offer general trading guidance that they first offered on MTA blogs. While Larry points out that Canadian investors need to watch global events, this is good advice for traders and investors in any country. There is an increasing degree of globalization in the markets and events in any country could set off a global crash. Keith highlights the role of the Federal Reserve, a force that no analyst can ignore anymore. We wrap up with a very brief look at two bubbles – tulips and subprime mortgages share some similarities that could help us spot future bubbles. I would appreciate any feedback you have on bubbles or any comments you have on our newsletter. Email us at editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, October 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-october-2012 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:34:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:34:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=46361 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 396912 [post_id] => 46361 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_1_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"28566";} ) [6] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 46385 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-09-15 12:00:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-09-15 16:00:20 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Scott Hathaway leads off this month’s issue with another example of how he uses geometry to identify market patterns. Scott has contributed to several issues of Technically Speaking and readers seem to be interested in his work. As always, Scott delivers enough detail to reproduce his techniques. Content in the rest of the issue reflects Scott’s philosophy of innovation and detail. We are getting an updated view of the metals market from Jordan Roy-Byrne, CMT. Jordan frequently publishes his forecasts and his thought process can be seen in reading his commentaries. We then reprint a couple of MTA Blog posts. This may be an overlooked member benefit but blogs found on MyMTA are often excellent research pieces. Scott frequently posts updates there and his latest insights in gold can be found there. Educational webcasts are also a benefit of MTA membership and two recent presentations are summarized. John Kosar, CMT, and Larry Connors are two very creative, data-driven technicians.  Although different in many ways, their work shares an attention to history and detail that is of value to any technician. Please let us know what you think about Technically Speaking. You can email us at editor@mta.org. Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, September 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-september-2012 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:34:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:34:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=46385 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 397136 [post_id] => 46385 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_0_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"28566";} ) [7] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 46586 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-04-15 12:00:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-04-15 16:00:52 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

This issue starts with an update on the CMT Program. The recent addition of Bob Johnson to the Program is a step toward making a great program even better. The rest of the issue is a collection of insights from practitioners in the field. Classic chart patterns still form the core of the discipline, but the patterns are being used in a number of different ways and the articles that follow will show just a small sample of the type of work technicians are doing today. Please let us know what you think about Technically Speaking by sending an email to editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, April 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-april-2012 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:47:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:47:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=46586 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 400340 [post_id] => 46586 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_9_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"28566";} ) [8] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 46670 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-03-15 12:00:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-03-15 16:00:23 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

This issue starts with a small preview of the upcoming Annual Symposium.  Michael Covel will be the keynote speaker and we are presenting a small sampling of his philosophy. Covel is an expert on trend following and is able to explain the strategy along with its rich history. His writings are a valuable source of information for traders and his talk will certainly be valuable for traders and those interested in market psychology and history. Also in this issue, Scott Hathaway offers another insightful article with another technique that he has developed. Last month he presented pentagonal analysis with detailed examples and a complete explanation of how you could apply the ideas to any chart. Scott recently explained his investing philosophy to me. He believes that “the mechanism behind the market is the collective unconscious of the trading community is a whole entity existing in our universe conforming to mathematical properties like everything else. Geometry of price and time helps to reveal these underlying fundamentals of this collective energy.” We are just beginning to see what is in Scott’s fertile mind, but his work seems to be in the tradition of Gann and Elliott. Market historians will also enjoy the article by George Schade who details the origin of the Schultz AT indicator. As always, we hope you’ll tell us what you think about Technically Speaking by sending an email to editor@mta.org Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, March 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-march-2012 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-25 13:21:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-25 17:21:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=46670 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 401001 [post_id] => 46670 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_2_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"28566";} ) [9] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 46705 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-02-15 12:00:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-02-15 17:00:26 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

This month we are providing a detailed overview of several interesting techniques. Scott Hathaway introduces pentagonal analysis with detailed examples and a complete explanation of how you could apply the ideas to any chart. Manuel Amunategui, CMT, offers very specific trading strategies that can be applied to help manage risk. James Brodie, CMT, describes the techniques he applies to trade a hedge fund. We also feature an interview with Esther de S.G. Elkaïm, CMT. These interviews are highlighting the diversity of technical analysis opportunities and hopefully showing the possibilities for those considering a career in technical analysis. Over the past months, the MTA has been searching for the right person to help bring the CMT program to the next level. After a thorough process, Robert Johnson, Ph.D., CFA, CAIA, was selected as Director, CMT Studies. Dr. Johnson will focus on enhancing the professionalism of the CMT Program and will eventually develop a customized curriculum for our candidates. In next month’s newsletter, we’ll have an interview with Dr. Johnson and get his first thoughts on the program. As always, we hope you’ll tell us what you think about Technically Speaking by sending an email to editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, February 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-february-2012 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-25 13:21:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-25 17:21:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=46705 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 401450 [post_id] => 46705 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_0_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"28566";} ) )

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