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Stanley Dash, CMT

Stanley Dash, CMT

Stanley Dash is the CMT Program Director at the CMT Association, a global credentialing body. In this role, Mr. Dash works with subject matter experts, candidates, and the Association’s members to maintain and improve the curriculum, the test experience, and the value of the charter. The Chartered Market Technician® (CMT) designation marks the highest education within the discipline and is the preeminent designation for practitioners of technical analysis worldwide.

Prior to joining CMT Association, Mr. Dash held the position of Vice-president, Applied Technical Analysis, at TradeStation, where he headed the TradeStation Labs initiative, supporting active and institutional traders with analytical tools and education designed to help them be more effective traders.

Mr. Dash began his career on Wall Street with E. F. Hutton & Co. in 1975. His experience includes institutional and retail trading, management, and compliance. Mr. Dash was also an active floor trader at one of the leading U.S. futures and options exchanges.

In the fields of training and public speaking, Mr. Dash has had long affiliations with such noteworthy organizations as the New York Institute of Finance and the Institute for Financial Markets. He has written and lectured on topics including stocks, futures, options and technical analysis, and has been quoted by Investor’s Business Daily, USA Today, TheStreet.com, Reuters, and the BBC, and has appeared on FoxNews.com Live and Fox News Radio Network.

During his years as a member of the CMT Association, he has served on the editorial board of the CMT’s Journal of Technical Analysis, the Ethics and Standards Committee, and the Curriculum and Test Committee. He was also the recipient of the CMT’s 2015 Recognition Award.

Mr. Dash has held registrations as an associated person (futures) and general securities principal. (Series 3, 7, 63, 24.)

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            [post_content] => There are many songs about the end of summer, most talking about getting back to work or school, essentially ending the lazy, carefree days. If that’s you, perhaps you forgot this is 2020! Up is down, Zoom is the word and Wednesday is Sunday (at Carvel). People cannot wait for fall, hoping that things will get better on the virus, economic and back-to-school fronts.

However, after several months of really good stock market action, September gave also us that rude awakening that stocks can actually go down, and by a lot, in any given day. Even worse, crude oil, after sitting there for months, looks terrible again. And the greenback, after hitting a multi-year low, looks kind of “bottomy.” Is that it for gold?

Never let it be said that the markets – all of them – are boring.

Now that we are all supposed to be back at work, whether virtual or in person, it is time to get back to our plans. Of course, not the same old plans, but plans to move forward, nonetheless. As you will see, content here is a bit beefier now than it was over the summer. And the Association is getting back to long-range planning and getting CMT testing back into gear. This month, we also announce the 2021 Charles H. Dow Award, with updated submission requirements.

Also in this edition, we have Rui Matos’ article on seasonality in the commodities markets, and how to hedge/profit using options. Alon Horesh shares his thoughts on Machine Learning with regard to finding support and resistance levels. And this month’s member interview is with Vincent Randazzo, CMT, from Lowry Research.

From the Association, we’ve got membership news, and an announcement for remote proctoring in the CMT exams. The Washington DC/Baltimore had a virtual meeting in July and offered a few notes about their guest speaker.

There you go. Keep your fingers crossed that we are on the road to normalcy.

Michael Kahn, CMT

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            [post_content] => The month of March is said to come in like a lion and go out like a lamb. If we apply that to this January, it was pretty much the reverse. After months of nary a hiccup, the stock market growled its way into the close and in the process wiped out its early gains.

It does seem that the market was set up for a problem, from overzealous sentiment to various valuation comparisons to 2000. Still, the real problem was knowing when. The market needed an excuse to do what it had to do and along came another deadly virus to virtually shut down the world’s second largest economy.

And what better time to think about what we did right and what we did wrong leading up to the top? Did we panic at the first whiff of the Hindenburg Omen? Was the CNN Fear and Greed Index our kryptonite? Did we play along with record unemployment? BTFD? Or panic when the yield curve arguably inverted again? Iran? China (the trade deal part)? Politics? Plunging oil? Plunging copper?

To all that, all the pure technician in me hears is, “blah, blah, blah.”

No, I’m not going to say none of that matters but it does make me appreciate the simply beauty in assessing price action itself. Or, as we say here in my new gig, Supply and Demand.

This month, we continue Bruno DiGiorgi’s History of Wall Street series with installment number five. We’ve also got a piece from a decade ago called The Top Technical Analysts, which answers the question many of us hear – “Where are the rich technicians?”  It was written in 2013 so the numbers are off, as are some of the firm names. But it is a timeless story that should make all technicians proud, especially when doubt creeps in that our processes don’t work anymore. 

This month’s member interview is with Greg Harmon, of Dragonfly Capital Management. Considering he never heard of the CMT Association until fairly recently, he’s gotten quite involved.

There is chapter news from New York and Minnesota, as per usual, and we once again plead for other chapters to let us know what is going on with their members and programs.

We’ve also got a list of CMT candidate resources, membership news and an invitation to submit a paper to one of our partner organizations. Don’t say there are no places for you to publish your ideas.  And as always, we’d love to publish something you wrote right here in this newsletter. Can you think of a better place for beginners to share their ideas? Don’t worry, we don’t bite. In fact, we’ll help you develop your writing style.

Michael Kahn, CMT

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Letter from the Editor

Well, another year is in the books and unless you were a short-only equities trader, you probably did well. I’m not going to give you the typical year-in-review in the markets because you all have your own charts. Rather, let’s look at where we are as an organization and all we need to know is that we are growing. We’re global. We’re recognized by the regulators. And we’re actually kind of fun. Yes, that fun is in a nerdy sort of way - but through chapter meetings, online presentations and the annual symposium, we do get together quite a bit. Of course, we also hoist a few cold ones after the serious stuff is over. I joined the organization in 1994, if memory serves. At first, I was just an associate member before I became a professional member. At the time, my membership was a bit unusual because I was not officially trading, advising or managing money with technical analysis. Rather, I was the technical analysis product manager for a vendor called Tradecenter, which was owned by Knight-Ridder Financial at the time. It was my job to identify new analyses to add to the service, define it for programmers, test it with real and simulated data and then teach the customers how to use it. From that starting point, I got more involved in the Association, first as a committee member, then a committee chair, then newsletter editor for the first time, and eventually as a member of the Board of Directors. There is plenty of diversity in what we do and plenty of opportunity in how you can contribute to the Association. I encourage you to find your angle of interest and simply join that committee. As a largely volunteer-powered organization, we need you! This month, we’ve got the latest installment of Bruno DiGiorgi’s History of Wall Street series, in which we learn more about how Wall Street got its name. The very reliable New York and Chicago chapters have speaker reviews for your enjoyment. And this month’s member interview is with David Keller, CMT. Toss in the usual Association news and there you have it. Michael Kahn, CMT Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, January 2020 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-january-2020 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:14:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:14:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=44360 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 362507 [post_id] => 44360 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_1_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2297";} ) [3] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 43422 [post_author] => 35924 [post_date] => 2019-12-10 10:05:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-10 15:05:33 [post_content] =>

Letter from the Editor

November proved to be an interesting month for the markets. Just before the market burped up a post-Thanksgiving 2% pullback, the Russell 2000 finally broke out from its 2019 range. False hope? Recession time? Once again, the sloth (look it up) of bearish economists was out with the utterly useless prediction that a recession was coming by the end of 2021.  Thanks for the heads up, fellas. Have you seen a price chart? I keep a collection of equally dim-witted headlines. Last month’s favorite was “Don’t Time the Market, but If You Do, Here’s When the Bear Might Come Knocking.” Do as I say, not as I do. Gold is still correcting, Oil showed a little stealthy increase, the dollar looks a little shaky and apparently Europe is still so bad that the ECB is dipping back in the QE well…Because it worked so well the last time.  Again, have they ever seen a price chart? This month in Technically Speaking, we’ve got part three of Bruno DiGiorgi’s History of Wall Street, and George Schade, CMT, continues the history theme with a story about preserving the technical analysis of legend Edmund W. Tabell. This month’s member interview is with Stanley Dash, Program Director of the CMT program and a well-established technician in his own right. You may know him as a technical educator at TradeStation, where he spread the gospel. New York, Minnesota and Richmond chapters weigh in with reviews of their recent speakers. Hey other chapters who are not Northern Ohio and Chicago, can you help a TA brother out with reviews of your own? In addition to all this, you can find Association news, congrats to new CMTs and another job posting all inside. If you’ve got a book out, let us know so we can tell everyone. Also, if you are hiring technicians, we can post that here. And one more time, I ask members to submit articles they’ve written (not forecasts but methods) or write something new to share your knowledge with the group. If you are new, this is a great way to develop your chops as an analyst and a writer. Yes, I am begging for content! It’s your Association. Get involved. To all, a joyous and profitable end of the year. See you back here in 2020. Michael Kahn, CMT Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, December 2019 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-december-2019 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:14:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:14:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=43422 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 346415 [post_id] => 43422 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_4_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2297";} ) [4] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 40215 [post_author] => 35924 [post_date] => 2019-10-03 15:49:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-03 19:49:34 [post_content] => Forget March. October came in like a lion as the news cycle and economic reports stomped on the bulls. Considering that September was rather tame, it was a big wake-up call for stock jocks. But September did have its moments. The U.S. dollar soared and the UUP bullish dollar ETF nearly hit all-time highs (set in 2008). Gold, which still holds a long-term breakout, faded all month, not surprisingly. Bitcoin barfed (my opinion embedded there). The long Treasury yield recovery failed while the curve inverted and un-inverted again. And crude oil gave up its gains and then some after the Saudi oil field attack. There are fun markets to trade everywhere! Lest we forget, after peaking in 2014, the number of UFO sightings dropped this year to date to a 19-year low. I don’t quite see the correlation to any market, and especially not cannabis. So, while we sip our pumpkin spice (barf again) and watch this October’s volatility, remember that the “good part” of the year is upon us. No, not the seasonal strength for stocks but the CMT Association’s rolling out of all sorts of good stuff to make your work life better and easier. In this issue, we’re re-running a series from Technically Speaking’s past on the history of Wall Street, written by Bruno DiGiorgi. Did you know how the term “broker” came about? It had nothing to do with investors getting broker the more they traded. And since we’re in the rerun spirit, we’ve got an article from Adam Koos that ran last May in Proactive Advisor magazine. In it, Adam details his CMT journey and how it helped him in his advisory business. It’s a testament to the value of the designation and the process of getting it. I’ve also included a short piece on the “spirit of technical analysis.” Basically, it asks the question, “Does your precise analysis make sense in the real world?” We have an interview with the legendary Louise Yamada, whose work decades ago helped shape the analysis we practice today. Of course, we’ll round it off with Association news, updates from the CMT program, members in the media and chapter speaker reviews from New York, Chicago and Minnesota. The latter two are my total favorite chapters because they share frequently. The rest of you, well, bless your hearts. Michael Kahn, CMT Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, October 2019 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-october-2019 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:14:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:14:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=40215 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 305008 [post_id] => 40215 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_9_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2297";} ) [5] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 38661 [post_author] => 35924 [post_date] => 2019-06-06 13:12:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-06 17:12:21 [post_content] => I know we Americans tend to have a self-centered view of things, but the U.S. market has outperformed most of the world for the past two years. Of course, there are some exceptions, notably in Australia, India and Saudi Arabia. Curiously, Greece and Russia appear to have woken up recently. Anyway, the point of this build-up is to say that May was one of the worst months in quite some time, only eclipsed by December 2018 in terms of net loss, based on the S&P 500 (October 2018 was about the same as May). The lingering trade battle with China and a threat towards Mexico got plenty of headlines. Too bad stiff resistance at 2935-2950 was not part of all the news that was fit to print. The yield curve got a lot scarier looking, and as I write this, bill yield is higher than benchmark 10-year yield (and the mythical 20-year yield). But is that an official inversion?  Take out bills and the rest is still upward-sloping. And the economy and markets are backing the Fed into a rate-cutting corner. And for you stock jockeys, have you noticed a resurgence in grains lately? There’s always a bull market somewhere (not a forecast!). In the newsletter this month, we continue with the regular features, including part 3 of Joyce and Daniel Miller’s lesson on copyrights. Yes, it can be a dry topic, but if you publish anything - from newsletters to full books - you should at least be aware of this stuff. The authors give you more than most of us will ever need, but I urge everyone to give the material at least a skim. This month’s member interview is with Greg Schnell of StockCharts.com. His story could be any one of ours. And we’ve got a reprint of Prof. Richard Lehman’s article on investment decision making. A little psychology, a little behavioral finance. And, of course, the news from around the Association with chapter meeting speaker reviews, CMT updates and even a few job openings. If you’ve got an analysis technique you’d like to share with the membership, why not put it on cyber paper and send it in. We’d love to publish articles about how members do their jobs. Michael Kahn, Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, June 2019 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-june-2019 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:16:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:16:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=38661 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 280260 [post_id] => 38661 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_7_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2297";} ) [6] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 38442 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2019-05-15 10:48:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-05-15 14:48:24 [post_content] => Just when everyone pooh-poohs our beloved “Sell in May” saw, it somehow starts to work. Or maybe it was just that the S&P 500 hit resistance on waning momentum? Hmm. I, for one, do not blame a tweet. And I also don’t expect this series of coincidences to dictate my summer outlook. By the way, as I write this, the Dow is right where it was when it (and the Spoo) scored their golden crosses in late March. The truth is that the markets have changed since some of our indicators were created or discovered, and we have to change with them.  That’s why it is so important to keep learning. And keep respecting your “stops” on indicators that no longer produce results. What better place to learn that at the CMT Association annual symposium? This year’s is in the books, but even if you were unable to attend, you’ll be able to get a few insights from the presenters. We’ve got summaries of several of them in this newsletter edition. If you were there and took notes, we’d love to get a few paragraphs of individual presentations or the seminar as a whole. Send them to me at editor@cmtassociation.org. Also in this issue is our series of member interviews, this month with John Kosar, CMT, of Asbury Research. Joyce and Dr. Daniel Miller are back with part two of their series on copyrights. This is an important topic for any of us that publish any works, from books to reports to blogs. We also pay tribute to long-time member Stephen Cox, CMT, who passed away this month. He was instrumental in establishing the Dow Award. And, of course, we’ve got some member news, from new CMTs to available resources. - Michael Kahn, Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, May 2019 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-may-2019 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:15:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:15:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=38442 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 276307 [post_id] => 38442 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_13_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2297";} ) [7] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 37944 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2019-03-11 14:25:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-03-11 18:25:39 [post_content] => The same old news seems to hang over the markets like a low level cow emission of uncertainty. Brexit – will it be hard or soft? China – will there be a trade deal or not? North Korea – nukes or no nukes? The Fed – quantitative tightening or not? Politics – not going there. The new news was the Green New Deal, spearheaded by the freshman representative from New York. This supposed economic stimulus and equality plan was widely criticized for its disruptive goals and impossibly fast timeline. We’ll leave the debating to the debaters and concentrate on what that means for us and our investing clients. Basically, it means some industries will get a boost and others will get a drag, if not elimination. Do we, or should we, really care about legislation that probably will not become law? The answer is yes, but for a reason any technical analyst should appreciate. There is already a trend in place towards a greener economy. Fully powered by the free market, we already see electric vehicles, high efficiency heating and cooling in buildings, natural gas heating oil and coal, renewable gas technology improving, solar and wind power costs coming down, and so on and so on. Green is coming, with or without a push from Washington. It’s what the people demand. They just don’t want to go cold turkey with no gas-powered pickup trucks, forced veganism and tripled electricity costs. This month, we’re getting ready for the 46th Annual Symposium, scheduled for April 4-5 in New York. There is still time to register. We also continue with our member interview series, this month featuring Mark Arbeter, CMT. In addition to this, we're carrying on the interview theme with a revisit to a presentation I did for the CMT Association last year called “Writing for the Media,” which teaches a few things about doing it right. And Lance Roberts offers some tips on being a good interview subject for TV or radio. Minnesota and Chicago chapters sent in reviews of recent meetings and Tom Bruni, CMT and our own Tyler Wood reviewed the recent Chart Summit weekend in Colorado. Of course, there is association news, including reason to show off your CMT designation. Be a CMT, loud and proud! Michael Kahn, CMT Editor, Technically Speaking [post_title] => Technically Speaking, March 2019 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-march-2019 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:17:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:17:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=37944 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 268585 [post_id] => 37944 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_4_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2297";} ) [8] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 37317 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2019-01-31 23:17:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-02-01 04:17:10 [post_content] => So far, this year has been dominated by the partial government shutdown. Does it affect the markets? Well, maybe indirectly. New issue IPOs are held up due to a lack of resources at the regulators. Tax refunds may be delayed, so investors might be a little cash tight. And most important of all, the shutdown and specter of a second downgrade of U.S. sovereign debt looms large. The deadline to raise or suspend the debt ceiling is just weeks away. Volatility in stocks remains high, bitcoin seems to be fading from interest, and for the first time in a long while gold shows signs of life. Naturally, the flattish yield curve, Brexit, and slowing global growth made the pundits warn of gloom and doom. Don’t tell Mr. Dow and Ms. Nazzie (or their Brazilian cousin Bovie). This month, the theme here centers on jobs. No, not jobs in the general economy, but jobs for technicians. We surveyed a group of technicians who took the plunge and went out on their own. After all, the number of direct, salaried jobs on the Street has dwindled - we’ve also got an article about a TA veteran who made that very point and told us what he did about it. The bottom line is that technical analysis is a very valuable skill to have, and where there’s a will, there’s a way to use it to make a living. Next, Dan Russo, CMT, offers his views on risk management, which is a very important topic for all of us. Of course, we’ve got news from around the association with chapter reports, CMT information, this month’s interview with George Schade, CMT and a review of the Mike Epstein Award presentation to Dave Lundgren, CMT, CFA by Julie Dahlquist, Ph.D., CMT. - Michael Kahn, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, February 2019 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-february-2019 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:15:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:15:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=37317 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 259509 [post_id] => 37317 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_8_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2297";} ) [9] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 35979 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2018-11-05 15:28:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-11-05 20:28:24 [post_content] =>

From the Editor

Well, October certainly lived up to its spooky and quite volatile reputation. From leading momo tech stocks tanking to multiple multi-percentage point intraday moves everywhere else, I am sure antacid makers made a tidy profit. Of course, coffee, sugar and crude oil had their own action and did you see palladium’s all-time high? This is my second edition of the new Technically Speaking and once again I must ask for volunteers to help us deliver a well-rounded offering with: Drop us a line at editor@CMTAssociation.org. We welcome everyone, including newly minted members. In this edition, we offer another of our member interviews with Phil Roth, CMT, a legend in the field and one of the most generous members with his time. And if I have not hit you over the head enough about getting involved, I’m re-running a piece I did a while ago called “Thoughts on Volunteering.” We also have part 2 in a series that ran back in the 1990s called “Lessons from Dead Pilots,” written by Mark Eidem CMT, CFA, which gives a fascinating comparison with traders. And a report from Clint Sorenson, CMT, CFA on how an investment advisor incorporates technical analysis into an otherwise fundamentally-driven business. Rounding it all out will be news from around the association – chapters, strategy, CMT news and events. Michael Kahn, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, November 2018 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-november-2018 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:17:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:17:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=35979 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 238867 [post_id] => 35979 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_6_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2297";} ) [10] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 34269 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2018-09-18 13:31:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-09-18 17:31:48 [post_content] =>

From the Editor

As Randy Quaid’s character said as he was about to slay the alien ship in Independence Day, “Hello boys – I’m baaack!” Hello boys and girls! After a 20-year hiatus, I am back at the helm of Technically Speaking. The good news is that unlike last time when it was just me, with the indomitable Barbara Gomperts handling production, we’ve got a full team handling the particulars, including gathering some of the content. Shout outs to Tyler Wood, Shane Skwarek, CMT Association CEO Alvin Kressler and the staff for all the help. The biggest change you will notice is that we’ve taken Technically Speaking back to a more traditional association newsletter where we focus on you, the member, and how the CMT Association can help you in your careers. Kudos to Mike Carr, CMT for his stewardship over the past few years. That was a flashback for me, because the last time I was editor, I relied on Mike for all sorts of content. Maybe we can twist his arm again! Aside from bringing you your association news, this inaugural newsletter is also a call to arms for members and associates. We need volunteers to help us deliver a well-rounded offering with: With that said, we’ll kick of the member interview series with the Godfather, Ralph Acampora, CMT, one of the founders of the CMT Association. We also have part 1 in a series that ran back in the 1990s called “Lessons from Dead Pilots,” written by Mark Eidem CMT, CFA, which gives a fascinating comparison with traders. And a big thank-you to Vincent M. Randazzo, CMT and the team at Lowry’s Research for their take on the advance-decline line. Rounding it all out will be news from around the association – committees, strategy, CMT news and events. Let us know what you think! Michael Kahn, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, September 2018 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => september-2018 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:19:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:19:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=34269 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 214517 [post_id] => 34269 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_2_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2297";} ) )

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