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Theodore N. Krintas, Ph.D

Theodore N. Krintas, Ph.D

Theodore Krintas is a C-level executive working in finance and technology industries since 1991. Experienced in developing, growing and expanding businesses, has closely worked with some legends of both industries in Greece and enjoys the appreciation of his colleagues and peers. As an asset manager, has exceeded the €100M mark in Assets Under Management, from Greek clients, three times in his career help leading three different startups, which is a rare record. In technology, focuses in its combination with finance, strategy, M&A, team building and organizational strength. Being one among the few to having the opportunity to move between finance and technology, is currently the Founder and CEO of a boutique consulting practice which helps companies finance soundly, enhance growth and establish internationally.

Mr. Krintas holds several professional certifications and credentials in accounting, financial consulting and investment analysis including the ACIIA, IARFC, HCMC, HCE, HEA, and ADEX. He earned his Ph.D. in Finance from the University of Thessaly, Greece in 2006, an MBA from University of Birmingham and Athens University of Economics, and did his undergraduate studies in business at the Athens School of Economics and Business. He is a founding member of the CMT Association’s Greek Chapter.

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            [post_content] => As I write this, the Nasdaq has completely erased its pandemic drop and most everything else looks pretty good. Overbought, but better than any of the so-called economists had predicted.

There is one thing we technicians need to watch and that is trying to put the market’s action since February in a neat little box. I am not saying that this time is different – because it never is different – but that really only applies to the forces that govern free markets. What happened was entirely created by the governments around the world. Don’t get me wrong – with the information we had at the time, it seemed like the right move.

In other words, to avoid being political, it was not the free market that caused the market to fall. We did not see breadth divergences that tipped off the arrival of the bear. We did not see any “nifty fifty” behavior where the entire market’s gain was due to a handful of stocks (don’t debate me on this; I know the extended FANG bunch was responsible for large percentages). The yield curve was right again. And money was still flowing - liquidity is bullish.

What we had were businesses being forced to close and people getting laid off through no fault of the companies for which they worked. But that is all starting to reverse, as we knew it would.

So why, then, should we be able to look at a chart pattern and expect it to predict as similar patterns created by true market forces? No, I am not saying supply and demand don’t work – they do. What troubles me is looking at trendlines and support and resistance levels and hoping they will work in the same way as they would during “normal” volatility, free market times.

Use your tools. Just remember the environment we are all in, and give them a little slack.

This month, we are light on content from chapters and committees, thanks to the lockdown, although the Minnesota Chapter remained quite active. However, you will see that the Association is implementing virtual meetings, which means that any member can attend any chapter meeting. That is a good idea!

This month’s interview is with Theodore Krintas, co-chair of the Hellenic Chapter in Greece. We’ve got an article connecting seasonality with the pandemic, which is very interesting but a little off of our technical analysis mission. And we also have to say goodbye to another long-time member and CMT contributor, Dick Dickson, who passed away suddenly on June 1.

Don't forget to check out the new educational content in the video archives with links at the bottom of this edition.

We hope you are all coping with the lockdown and the slow reopening. Be safe.
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            [post_content] => I know we Americans tend to have a self-centered view of things, but the U.S. market has outperformed most of the world for the past two years. Of course, there are some exceptions, notably in Australia, India and Saudi Arabia. Curiously, Greece and Russia appear to have woken up recently.

Anyway, the point of this build-up is to say that May was one of the worst months in quite some time, only eclipsed by December 2018 in terms of net loss, based on the S&P 500 (October 2018 was about the same as May). The lingering trade battle with China and a threat towards Mexico got plenty of headlines. Too bad stiff resistance at 2935-2950 was not part of all the news that was fit to print.

The yield curve got a lot scarier looking, and as I write this, bill yield is higher than benchmark 10-year yield (and the mythical 20-year yield). But is that an official inversion?  Take out bills and the rest is still upward-sloping. And the economy and markets are backing the Fed into a rate-cutting corner.

And for you stock jockeys, have you noticed a resurgence in grains lately? There’s always a bull market somewhere (not a forecast!).

In the newsletter this month, we continue with the regular features, including part 3 of Joyce and Daniel Miller’s lesson on copyrights. Yes, it can be a dry topic, but if you publish anything - from newsletters to full books - you should at least be aware of this stuff. The authors give you more than most of us will ever need, but I urge everyone to give the material at least a skim.

This month’s member interview is with Greg Schnell of StockCharts.com. His story could be any one of ours. And we’ve got a reprint of Prof. Richard Lehman’s article on investment decision making. A little psychology, a little behavioral finance.

And, of course, the news from around the Association with chapter meeting speaker reviews, CMT updates and even a few job openings.

If you’ve got an analysis technique you’d like to share with the membership, why not put it on cyber paper and send it in. We’d love to publish articles about how members do their jobs.

Michael Kahn, Editor
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