public

Laurence Connors

Laurence Connors

Laurence Connors is Chairman of The Connors Group (TCG), and the principal executive officer of Connors Research LLC. TCG is a financial markets information company that publishes daily commentary and insight concerning the financial markets and has twice received an award by the Entrex Private Company Index for being one of the 10 fastest growing private companies.

He has over 30 years of experience working in the financial markets industry. He started his career in 1982 at Merrill Lynch as an Investment Advisor, and later moved on to become a Vice President with Donaldson, Lufkin, Jenrette (DLJ), where he worked with the Investment Services Group from October 1990 to March 1994.

Mr. Connors is widely regarded as one of the leading educators in the financial markets industry. He has authored over 20 books on market strategies and volatility trading, including Short-Term Trading Strategies That Work, and Street Smarts (with Linda Raschke). Street Smarts was selected by Technical Analysis of Stocks and Commodities magazine as one of “The Classics” for trading books written in the 20th century.  His most recent book The Alpha Formula: Beat the Market with Significantly Less Risk (with Chris Cain, CMT) is now available.

Mr. Connors has been featured and quoted in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Barron’s, Bloomberg TV & Radio, Bloomberg Magazine, Dow Jones Newswire, Yahoo Finance, E-Trade Financial Daily, Technical Analysis of Stocks and Commodities, and many others. Mr. Connors has also been a featured speaker at a number of major investment conferences over the past two decades.

Array
(
    [0] => stdClass Object
        (
            [ID] => 45949
            [post_author] => 2
            [post_date] => 2013-06-15 12:00:46
            [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-15 16:00:46
            [post_content] => 

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

We focus on the practical in this month’s newsletter. From trading psychology to trading tools and trading strategies, we have tried to provide you with new ideas that you can apply in the slow summer market. Of course, the slow summer market is probably a myth but we all need to find time to explore ideas and tools that might help us become better at what we do. Trading seems to be the point where theory meets practice in technical analysis. Hopefully you will find the techniques and tools we highlight to be useful. Although trading is often associated with short-term analysis, many traders analyze long-term data. In the long-term, stocks can move up or down just as they do in the short-term. SRC Stock Charts offer a long-term perspective on markets and we conclude this issue with a chart of Japan’s Nikkei 225 stock index. The Nikkei ended May with a one-week loss of 15% but is up about 50% in the last year. Shortterm volatility can mask the relentless down trend that defines that market. Over the past 25 years, the Nikkei has lost an average of 2.8% a year. Please email us with suggestions for other long-term charts to highlight the ups and downs of trading for a living. We can be reached at editor@mta.org. Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, June 2013 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-june-2013 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:34:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:34:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=45949 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 391284 [post_id] => 45949 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_6_contributor [meta_value] => a:3:{i:0;s:4:"2494";i:1;s:5:"36576";i:2;s:4:"6104";} ) [1] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 46385 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-09-15 12:00:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-09-15 16:00:20 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Scott Hathaway leads off this month’s issue with another example of how he uses geometry to identify market patterns. Scott has contributed to several issues of Technically Speaking and readers seem to be interested in his work. As always, Scott delivers enough detail to reproduce his techniques. Content in the rest of the issue reflects Scott’s philosophy of innovation and detail. We are getting an updated view of the metals market from Jordan Roy-Byrne, CMT. Jordan frequently publishes his forecasts and his thought process can be seen in reading his commentaries. We then reprint a couple of MTA Blog posts. This may be an overlooked member benefit but blogs found on MyMTA are often excellent research pieces. Scott frequently posts updates there and his latest insights in gold can be found there. Educational webcasts are also a benefit of MTA membership and two recent presentations are summarized. John Kosar, CMT, and Larry Connors are two very creative, data-driven technicians.  Although different in many ways, their work shares an attention to history and detail that is of value to any technician. Please let us know what you think about Technically Speaking. You can email us at editor@mta.org. Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, September 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-september-2012 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:34:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:34:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=46385 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 397432 [post_id] => 46385 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_5_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2494";} ) [2] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 46586 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-04-15 12:00:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-04-15 16:00:52 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

This issue starts with an update on the CMT Program. The recent addition of Bob Johnson to the Program is a step toward making a great program even better. The rest of the issue is a collection of insights from practitioners in the field. Classic chart patterns still form the core of the discipline, but the patterns are being used in a number of different ways and the articles that follow will show just a small sample of the type of work technicians are doing today. Please let us know what you think about Technically Speaking by sending an email to editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, April 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-april-2012 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:47:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:47:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=46586 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 399952 [post_id] => 46586 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_5_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2494";} ) [3] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 47060 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2011-11-15 12:00:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2011-11-15 17:00:02 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Our Ethics Corner feature has generated some feedback, and this month we are revisiting the first case study we presented. As expected, there is room for differences of opinion on ethics questions. In part, the growth of international membership in the MTA should guarantee some discussion on ethics. Laws differ among countries and cultural differences are greater than many assume. Perhaps the only undeniable truth in ethics is that people are not all alike. Different people hold different opinions, which is the underlying reason we have a market to trade. While cultural differences must be considered in any situation, the Standards defined in the MTA Code of Ethics are mandatory for all members and affiliates. While there may be a less strict requirement defined in local laws at times, the Code of Ethics requires that the stricter rules of the Code must be the guide. Obviously if the law is stricter than the Code of Ethics, the Code does not offer an excuse for breaking the law. We look forward to continuing discussions on ethics. It is important to our profession to hear as many opinions as possible. By understanding why some scenarios present “grey zones” we can make professional ethics stronger. Please send any comments to editor@mta.org. Sincerely, Mike Carr, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, November 2011 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-november-2011 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-25 13:23:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-25 17:23:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=47060 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 406143 [post_id] => 47060 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_3_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2494";} ) [4] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 47997 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2009-08-15 12:00:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-08-15 16:00:16 [post_content] =>

Letter from the Editor

Trading and getting involved in the MTA are the focus of this month's newsletter. Dan Zanger is a short-term trader with an enviable record of success. Ajay Jani offers insights into his thinking, and then we reprint what Dan considers to be among his most important rules. We also review a new book by Larry Connors and Cesar Alvarez from TradingMarkets.com. Short-term trading can offer high potential profits, but these articles also address the risk which is inseparable from trading. We also have news from the MTA Educational Foundation and the Journal Committee. The MTA is constantly advancing into academia and these initiatives are at the forefront of that march. This will add value to your membership and bring added prestige to the CMT designation by improving the acceptance of technical analysis within the investment community. Please let us know what you think of the newsletter, and how we can improve this member benefit for you. Sincerely, Mike Carr, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, August 2009 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-august-2009 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-20 20:17:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-21 00:17:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=47997 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 424697 [post_id] => 47997 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_2_contributor [meta_value] => a:3:{i:0;s:4:"2494";i:1;s:5:"36576";i:2;s:4:"7251";} ) [5] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 48120 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2009-03-15 12:00:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2009-03-15 16:00:58 [post_content] =>

Letter from the Editor

In this issue of Technically Speaking, we provide a great deal of information on market breadth. An interview with well known technician Dick Arms provides insight into the work and current thinking of an industry legend. Several articles detail a small part of the work of Dr. Humphrey Lloyd, unknown to the majority of technicians. Although trained as a pathologist, he has written widely on technical analysis and has developed unique and useful indicators. In learning about Dr. Lloyd’s work, I personally was struck by the similarity to the life of a technician who came to the field late in life but produced more than many others who spend their whole lives researching market action – Arthur A. Merrill, CMT. Both enjoyed great success in their original profession. Both brought the skills they employed in that profession to the markets. Both men were prolific authors, sharing their knowledge with all who wished to learn. But the most defining characteristic of both is that they can best be described as “gentlemen.” This is an adjective that few aspire to in the current environment. Wall Street is more associated with greed than anything else today. But there are still gentlemen and gentlewomen in our field, and I strongly urge the young technicians to reach out to them and learn about technical analysis, and life, from these examples of the life well lived. Sincerely, Mike Carr, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, March 2009 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-march-2009 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-21 17:59:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-21 21:59:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=48120 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 428171 [post_id] => 48120 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_7_contributor [meta_value] => a:3:{i:0;s:4:"2494";i:1;s:5:"36576";i:2;s:4:"7251";} ) [6] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 48738 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2007-01-15 12:00:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2007-01-15 17:00:25 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

We start the New Year with a new look for Technically Speaking. Tim Licitra has been working hard to make this newsletter more visually appealing, and in the coming months he’ll continue to lead this effort. If you have any suggestions, don’t hesitate to contact him. As you’ll read throughout this issue, the MTA is trying to actively engage all its members in the business of the Association. This theme is found in articles by Charlie Kirkpatrick, CMT about the MTA Educational Foundation, the letter from Executive Director Tom Silveri, and the short note from our newly appointed Volunteer Czar, Fred Meissner. CMT. I hope you’ll consider contacting Fred and getting more involved – we need your help. Although we include a lot of MTA news, this month’s issue also presents some practical investment research and a brief article on trading psychology. Larry Connors from TradingMarkets.com recently completed some research on the best trading days of the month, and we are able to reprint that. This work could form the basis of a futures trading strategy or can help you time monthly mutual fund purchases. Without a doubt, it has applicability to all traders. Andy Ratkai, CFA, recently published an article reminding us to rely on our own work, and not to become overly invested in the opinions of others. It seems like a nice way to start trading this year, consciously resolving to ignore the talking heads on CNBC and in the press and doing our own work. Finally, Dave Aronson, CMT, has written a book asking us to think about raising the bar in our research. Statistical significance would increase the credibility of technical research and should increase your trading profits, a true win-win outcome. I conclude by quoting an old Wall Street adage, “May your best trade of last year be your worst trade of the New Year.” Mike Carr, CMT Editor, Technically Speaking [post_title] => Technically Speaking, January 2007 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-january-2007 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:00:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:00:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=48738 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 444470 [post_id] => 48738 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_5_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2494";} ) [7] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 52305 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2005-09-15 12:00:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2005-09-15 16:00:24 [post_content] =>

From the Editor’s Desk

Although September is seasonally a weak month for the stock market, it looks like a pretty strong one for the MTA and Technically Speaking. On the cover, long-time MTA Member and cycles expert Peter Eliades pays tribute to James M. Hurst, who passed away on August 18th at the age of 81. Mr. Hurst is one of the founding fathers of technical analysis. His classic book, “The Profit Magic of Stock Transaction Timing”, was the reason Peter chose technical analysis as his life’s work. Inside, there are some terrific educational articles by Dave Landry on swing trading (Part 2 in a 3-Part series), by Larry Connors on up days in a row versus down days in a row in the stock market, and on inflation-adjusted stock market trends by Dr. Brett Steenbarger. In addition, our Executive Director John Kirby gives us a progress report in the MTA’s transition to our new technology platform, Net Forum by Avectra. Early this year, fellow MTA Board Member Duke Jones and I were personally involved in the process of evaluating our then-current platform, and deciding whether the Association needed to make a change. Although change is always difficult and this situation was no exception, Duke and I determined that it was imperative for the MTA to move to a platform that could accommodate its recent growth, and handle the additional growth expected in the years ahead. Duke and I believe this platform will be the gift that keeps on giving to the MTA in the years to come, and would like to thank John Kirby and his staff for all their hard work during this transition period. Please take a look at the line-up of speakers and agenda for the 18th Annual IFTA Conference in Vancouver in early November, hosted by the Canadian Society of Technical Analysts (CSTA), and the MTA’s 2005 Mid-Winter Retreat in mid-January in Miami Beach. Two great locations, and two great opportunities to learn from and network with other technicians. Check them out. Finally, Technically Speaking would like to welcome four new Contributing Editors; Matt Blackman, Mohan Turaga, Jeannette Young, CMT and Garry Rissman. We look forward to reading articles and reviews by these MTA Members in future issues. The MTA still needs more Associate Editors. If you are interested in getting involved with Technically Speaking, by writing an article, covering a regional meeting, whatever, please contact me at editor@mta.org. All Contributing Editors will be sent a digital camera with all the accessories so we can include more photos in futures issues. We all know technicians like pictures! Hope everyone enjoys this issue. Respectfully, John Kosar, CMT, Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, September, 2005 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-september-2005 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-12 13:06:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-12 17:06:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=52305 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 541008 [post_id] => 52305 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_7_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:4:"2494";} ) )

Contributions