public

Tyler Wood

Tyler Wood

Tyler Wood is the Managing Director of Global Business Development at the CMT Association. In collaboration with CMT Association members and charterholders, Tyler has presented the tools of technical analysis around the world to investment firms, regulators, exchanges, and broker-dealers.

As an executive manager over the past 20 years, Tyler has built and brought products to market in the educational technology space and financial services industry. Throughout his career, Tyler has managed brand, communications, and sales teams to drive top-line revenue growth for public, private, and non-profit entities.

Prior to joining the CMT Association, Tyler worked in management consulting and publishing. Tyler graduated from Macalester College and received his MBA from the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University.

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            [post_content] => With the vaccine roll-out in full swing, we can truly see the light at the end of the tunnel. For those of us in the colder Northern climates, the pending Spring is double good news since we’ve been cooped up inside our own homes. Who cannot wait to go to their favorite restaurant and not have to wear a parka?

The downside? Now we have to shed those pandemic pounds so we can wear more than sweat pants. I think I’ll take that.

Since mid-February, the markets have finally been interesting. Tech investors saw a “correction” while at the very same time portions of the rest of the market were at all-time highs. Gold is in the tank but oil is at multi-month highs. Remember last year when it went negative? Fun times – not. And have you seen copper?

Then, of course, there is all that debt out there. Liquidity … until the piper shows up for payment.

On a more somber note, over the past few weeks we’ve lost three great people and assets to the Association. Les Williams was a model of involvement, with participation and leadership in many areas in the Association over the years. Not only that, he was a genuinely nice guy and his signature adorns the CMT charter hanging on my wall. Bernadette Murphy, who was known to greater Wall Street as a leader for decades, was instrumental in legitimizing technical analysis as a true investment discipline. Younger members may not know of her, but they should. Memorials for both of these great people are in this month’s edition, and this month’s photo archive features a few shots of them. We've also got a brief tribute to Bill Sharp, co-founder and past President of the CSTA - the technical society in Canada.

This month’s member interview is with Michael Gayed CFA, who is a multiple winner of the Dow Award and awards from other groups. Walter Deemer, a now-retired technical analysis veteran, has put decades of his writings and analysis online for all to see. What was it like in the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s? Just read his comments.

He also happens to be the subject of this month’s Fill the Gap, the CMT Association's official podcast.

Of course, we have news from the Association, and President Scott Richter offers his thoughts about helping our colleagues out of any lingering career effects from the pandemic.

Don’t forget, you can submit articles for publication here. As long as they are about technical analysis or the business (not forecasts) we want to see them. Yes, even from brand new analysts. Write something. How do you think I, a physics major in college, got to be a columnist and editor? I wrote – a lot. Now it is your turn.

We want your photos, too. Book reviews, software reviews, thoughts on regulation, anything that members would find useful or interesting relating to technical analysis.

Michael Kahn, CMT

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            [post_content] => This month marks the one-year anniversary of the start of the 2020 market debacle. Think about how far we’ve all come since then: new highs, economic recovery, light at the end of the COVID tunnel and plenty of other things. We mourn for those we’ve lost and look forward to when our daily activities can return to normal.

What the pandemic may have done is accelerate trends in innovation and massive changes in how we work and play. Think about that when you fire up your Sony Betamax and Palm Pilot. Does your computer have a floppy disc drive? It may not even have a CD drive, anymore.

To quote an old French proverb, “the more things change, the more they stay the same.” The point is that the economy is always changing and industries come into and out of favor. So does debt. And hard assets. And entertainment. And travel. And real estate. You get the point. Don’t get stuck on yesterday’s trends. We are likely starting some huge ones now.

This month, we’ve dipped into the archives for a piece written by our own Dr. Julie Dahlquist many years ago. It talks about how there is good information in technical indicators. And, of course, it never hurts that it pokes a little fun at our economist colleagues.

And speaking of archives, there is one more photo from deep in the history of the Association. If you have any photos of seminars, speeches, winter retreats or just at the bar with fellow technicians, please send them along. We lost many great photos when our office in the Twin Towers came down on 9/11.

This month’s member interview is with Association Vice President Brett Villaume. And our president, Scott Richter, addresses how technical analysis helped him and his firm navigate the frothy waters of the recent short squeeze-a-palooza. Also, while a little delayed, this month’s chapter summary from Hong Kong presents the most thorough account of their December speakers. For those of us in an American mindset, the focus was on Asian markets, so consider that a treat.

Top it off with Association news and a link to the second offering in our new podcast series, “Fill the Gap,” and some recognition of recent member award winners across the globe.

Don’t forget, we can always use content. How about exercising your writing chops and sending in something about how you analyze the markets or how the Association has made your professional life better? No forecasts, please.

Michael Kahn, CMT

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            [post_content] => Well gang, we made it. The New Year is here and 2020 is in the rear-view mirror. I hope we all learned something, and that includes something about market behavior.

Although the stock market ended at all-time highs, it was a rather lackluster December with not much in the way of enthusiasm. Of course, we can come up with all sorts of excuses, such as politics, pandemics (not to make light of it) and payments (stimulus, or lack thereof). This did not matter, as Santa came a-calling and stocks came out of the gate at full gallop. Bitcoin at $42,000. Nothing to see here, bubbleheads. Maybe a breakout in bond yields might get you worried? Move along. How about Tesla? Who cares, as long as the Russell is outperforming?

You can take away what you like from all of that. Most of us, of course, will let the charts tell us when something is changing.

The January edition of Technically Speaking is Association-centric, with news of and about our membership and activities. Topping the list is the inaugural edition of our new official podcast, Fill the Gap, featuring first Association president Bob Farrell. We even have an old photo of Bob in the Photo Archive this month.

Also, read about the Academic Partner Program, as we expand the presence and teaching of technical analysis at the university level. And don’t forget, nominations for new Directors of the Association are now open. This is a good time to network and find out who can help steer the Association for the next few years.

This month’s member interview is with Jeff Weiss, CMT, who many members know as an energetic speaker and educator, not to mention a pretty good technician. We’ve got the regular Association news, including some career opportunities, a chapter speaker summary and announcement of the upcoming Weath365 Summit, where several of our members are speaking and all members are welcome at no cost.

Don’t forget, we are always looking for contributed articles and you can repurpose something you’ve already written. Just limit it to education, market environment or the business of being a technician. Market forecasts do not age well. We are always here at editor@cmtassociation.org.

Michael Kahn, CMT

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            [post_content] => The joke running around the Internet is that this 2020 Leap Year had 29 days in February, 300 days in March and five years in April. It is already a year of biblical proportions, with locusts swarming in Africa, the global plague of COVID-19, and then murder hornets arriving in Washington state. The foot of snow that fell in the Northeast on May 8 seemed mild, but we can just wonder if June is thinking, “hold my beer.”

Yes, it is a different world. Millions are out of work, yet the stock market is on the road to recovery. I hold my tongue when my online friends wonder how that could be. It brings me to a quote from former Association president Phil Roth, who said, “The biggest mistake a fundamental analyst makes is thinking a stock and a company are the same thing. The biggest mistake a technical analyst makes is thinking they are different.”

But wait! There’s more!

Let’s not forget that crude oil traded at negative numbers in April thanks to the destruction of demand in the pandemic and so much supply that there was literally no place to put it. And the government is flooding the market with so much liquidity that negative interest rates seem to be a given in the U.S., as they already are across Europe and the world. The Fed wants to buy junk bonds, for crying out loud!

But again, in a world where many businesses were mandated to close, that fortunately does not apply to most of us in the Association. Our businesses can exist in a no-touch world. And it is our responsibility to keep going, and to be thankful.

In this month’s issue, we are thankful for the time spent with several technicians who have passed away. Tony Tabell, the second Association president is memorialized by Ken Tower, who worked for him long ago. Kenneth Safian, a long-time member and contributor also left us, as did Jim Schmidt, publisher of Timer Digest.

The CMT Association's own Barbara Terry has a great story about the initiative between the CMT Association and the CFA Association in Minnesota to fight hunger.

Also in Minnesota, that Chapter held its first virtual meeting with speaker Mark Newton, CMT.

This month’s member interview is with Jim Erdmier, CMT, co-chair of the Chicago Chapter. We acknowledge members who were finalists and winners in their categories at the Technical Analyst (magazine) Awards. And, of course, we’ve got a few encouraging words from the CMT Association president and other Association news as we continue to mint fresh new CMTs.

Lockdown, schmockdown! The CMT Association is open for business!

Michael Kahn, CMT

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            [post_content] => The month of March is said to come in like a lion and go out like a lamb. If we apply that to this January, it was pretty much the reverse. After months of nary a hiccup, the stock market growled its way into the close and in the process wiped out its early gains.

It does seem that the market was set up for a problem, from overzealous sentiment to various valuation comparisons to 2000. Still, the real problem was knowing when. The market needed an excuse to do what it had to do and along came another deadly virus to virtually shut down the world’s second largest economy.

And what better time to think about what we did right and what we did wrong leading up to the top? Did we panic at the first whiff of the Hindenburg Omen? Was the CNN Fear and Greed Index our kryptonite? Did we play along with record unemployment? BTFD? Or panic when the yield curve arguably inverted again? Iran? China (the trade deal part)? Politics? Plunging oil? Plunging copper?

To all that, all the pure technician in me hears is, “blah, blah, blah.”

No, I’m not going to say none of that matters but it does make me appreciate the simply beauty in assessing price action itself. Or, as we say here in my new gig, Supply and Demand.

This month, we continue Bruno DiGiorgi’s History of Wall Street series with installment number five. We’ve also got a piece from a decade ago called The Top Technical Analysts, which answers the question many of us hear – “Where are the rich technicians?”  It was written in 2013 so the numbers are off, as are some of the firm names. But it is a timeless story that should make all technicians proud, especially when doubt creeps in that our processes don’t work anymore.

This month’s member interview is with Greg Harmon, of Dragonfly Capital Management. Considering he never heard of the CMT Association until fairly recently, he’s gotten quite involved.

There is chapter news from New York and Minnesota, as per usual, and we once again plead for other chapters to let us know what is going on with their members and programs.

We’ve also got a list of CMT candidate resources, membership news and an invitation to submit a paper to one of our partner organizations. Don’t say there are no places for you to publish your ideas.  And as always, we’d love to publish something you wrote right here in this newsletter. Can you think of a better place for beginners to share their ideas? Don’t worry, we don’t bite. In fact, we’ll help you develop your writing style.

Michael Kahn, CMT

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Letter from the Editor

Well, another year is in the books and unless you were a short-only equities trader, you probably did well. I’m not going to give you the typical year-in-review in the markets because you all have your own charts. Rather, let’s look at where we are as an organization and all we need to know is that we are growing. We’re global. We’re recognized by the regulators. And we’re actually kind of fun. Yes, that fun is in a nerdy sort of way - but through chapter meetings, online presentations and the annual symposium, we do get together quite a bit. Of course, we also hoist a few cold ones after the serious stuff is over. I joined the organization in 1994, if memory serves. At first, I was just an associate member before I became a professional member. At the time, my membership was a bit unusual because I was not officially trading, advising or managing money with technical analysis. Rather, I was the technical analysis product manager for a vendor called Tradecenter, which was owned by Knight-Ridder Financial at the time. It was my job to identify new analyses to add to the service, define it for programmers, test it with real and simulated data and then teach the customers how to use it. From that starting point, I got more involved in the Association, first as a committee member, then a committee chair, then newsletter editor for the first time, and eventually as a member of the Board of Directors. There is plenty of diversity in what we do and plenty of opportunity in how you can contribute to the Association. I encourage you to find your angle of interest and simply join that committee. As a largely volunteer-powered organization, we need you! This month, we’ve got the latest installment of Bruno DiGiorgi’s History of Wall Street series, in which we learn more about how Wall Street got its name. The very reliable New York and Chicago chapters have speaker reviews for your enjoyment. And this month’s member interview is with David Keller, CMT. Toss in the usual Association news and there you have it. Michael Kahn, CMT Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, January 2020 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-january-2020 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-04-07 16:21:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-04-07 20:21:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=44360 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 363174 [post_id] => 44360 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_7_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"26994";} ) [6] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 43422 [post_author] => 35924 [post_date] => 2019-12-10 10:05:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-10 15:05:33 [post_content] =>

Letter from the Editor

November proved to be an interesting month for the markets. Just before the market burped up a post-Thanksgiving 2% pullback, the Russell 2000 finally broke out from its 2019 range. False hope? Recession time? Once again, the sloth (look it up) of bearish economists was out with the utterly useless prediction that a recession was coming by the end of 2021.  Thanks for the heads up, fellas. Have you seen a price chart? I keep a collection of equally dim-witted headlines. Last month’s favorite was “Don’t Time the Market, but If You Do, Here’s When the Bear Might Come Knocking.” Do as I say, not as I do. Gold is still correcting, Oil showed a little stealthy increase, the dollar looks a little shaky and apparently Europe is still so bad that the ECB is dipping back in the QE well…Because it worked so well the last time.  Again, have they ever seen a price chart? This month in Technically Speaking, we’ve got part three of Bruno DiGiorgi’s History of Wall Street, and George Schade, CMT, continues the history theme with a story about preserving the technical analysis of legend Edmund W. Tabell. This month’s member interview is with Stanley Dash, Program Director of the CMT program and a well-established technician in his own right. You may know him as a technical educator at TradeStation, where he spread the gospel. New York, Minnesota and Richmond chapters weigh in with reviews of their recent speakers. Hey other chapters who are not Northern Ohio and Chicago, can you help a TA brother out with reviews of your own? In addition to all this, you can find Association news, congrats to new CMTs and another job posting all inside. If you’ve got a book out, let us know so we can tell everyone. Also, if you are hiring technicians, we can post that here. And one more time, I ask members to submit articles they’ve written (not forecasts but methods) or write something new to share your knowledge with the group. If you are new, this is a great way to develop your chops as an analyst and a writer. Yes, I am begging for content! It’s your Association. Get involved. To all, a joyous and profitable end of the year. See you back here in 2020. Michael Kahn, CMT Editor [post_title] => Technically Speaking, December 2019 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-december-2019 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-04-07 16:22:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-04-07 20:22:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=43422 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 346237 [post_id] => 43422 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_0_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"26994";} ) [7] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 37944 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2019-03-11 14:25:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-03-11 18:25:39 [post_content] => The same old news seems to hang over the markets like a low level cow emission of uncertainty. Brexit – will it be hard or soft? China – will there be a trade deal or not? North Korea – nukes or no nukes? The Fed – quantitative tightening or not? Politics – not going there. The new news was the Green New Deal, spearheaded by the freshman representative from New York. This supposed economic stimulus and equality plan was widely criticized for its disruptive goals and impossibly fast timeline. We’ll leave the debating to the debaters and concentrate on what that means for us and our investing clients. Basically, it means some industries will get a boost and others will get a drag, if not elimination. Do we, or should we, really care about legislation that probably will not become law? The answer is yes, but for a reason any technical analyst should appreciate. There is already a trend in place towards a greener economy. Fully powered by the free market, we already see electric vehicles, high efficiency heating and cooling in buildings, natural gas heating oil and coal, renewable gas technology improving, solar and wind power costs coming down, and so on and so on. Green is coming, with or without a push from Washington. It’s what the people demand. They just don’t want to go cold turkey with no gas-powered pickup trucks, forced veganism and tripled electricity costs. This month, we’re getting ready for the 46th Annual Symposium, scheduled for April 4-5 in New York. There is still time to register. We also continue with our member interview series, this month featuring Mark Arbeter, CMT. In addition to this, we're carrying on the interview theme with a revisit to a presentation I did for the CMT Association last year called “Writing for the Media,” which teaches a few things about doing it right. And Lance Roberts offers some tips on being a good interview subject for TV or radio. Minnesota and Chicago chapters sent in reviews of recent meetings and Tom Bruni, CMT and our own Tyler Wood reviewed the recent Chart Summit weekend in Colorado. Of course, there is association news, including reason to show off your CMT designation. Be a CMT, loud and proud! Michael Kahn, CMT Editor, Technically Speaking [post_title] => Technically Speaking, March 2019 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-march-2019 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:17:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:17:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=37944 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 268595 [post_id] => 37944 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_5_contributor [meta_value] => a:2:{i:0;s:5:"26994";i:1;s:5:"37951";} ) [8] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 36803 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2018-12-27 13:40:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-12-27 18:40:30 [post_content] => They say March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb. Well, 2018 came in like a lion and seems to have gone out like a lion, too. Check out this chart of the Dow’s daily true range going back to early 2016. Something is clearly different in 2018.   If there is one thing we can say about the markets, it’s that they're like a box of chocolates. Okay - Forrest Gump, CMT, might have said that. As we reach our stride with the new newsletter format, we still need your feedback. What do you like? What would you like to see? Drop us a line at editor@CMTAssociation.org. And we could still use some volunteers to help with book, software and seminar reviews. This month’s member interview is with two-time former past President Bruce Kamich. We’ve got the third, and final, installment of the reboot of Mark Eidem, CMT, CFA’s series on “Lessons from Dead Pilots,” again, which gives a fascinating comparison with traders. And I did an interview with David Aferiat with a look at how TradeIdeas sees artificial intelligence coming to money management and trading. Don’t worry, you won’t be replaced (at least not yet). Of course, there is plenty of Association and chapter news, plus a review by Tyler Wood of the recent ETF Global Conference. Hope your holidays were relaxing, and may your New Year be your best yet! Michael Kahn, CMT [post_title] => Technically Speaking, December 2018 - January 2019 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-december-2018 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-08-03 11:18:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-08-03 15:18:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=36803 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 252395 [post_id] => 36803 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_4_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"26994";} ) [9] => stdClass Object ( [ID] => 46670 [post_author] => 2 [post_date] => 2012-03-15 12:00:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-03-15 16:00:23 [post_content] =>

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

This issue starts with a small preview of the upcoming Annual Symposium.  Michael Covel will be the keynote speaker and we are presenting a small sampling of his philosophy. Covel is an expert on trend following and is able to explain the strategy along with its rich history. His writings are a valuable source of information for traders and his talk will certainly be valuable for traders and those interested in market psychology and history. Also in this issue, Scott Hathaway offers another insightful article with another technique that he has developed. Last month he presented pentagonal analysis with detailed examples and a complete explanation of how you could apply the ideas to any chart. Scott recently explained his investing philosophy to me. He believes that “the mechanism behind the market is the collective unconscious of the trading community is a whole entity existing in our universe conforming to mathematical properties like everything else. Geometry of price and time helps to reveal these underlying fundamentals of this collective energy.” We are just beginning to see what is in Scott’s fertile mind, but his work seems to be in the tradition of Gann and Elliott. Market historians will also enjoy the article by George Schade who details the origin of the Schultz AT indicator. As always, we hope you’ll tell us what you think about Technically Speaking by sending an email to editor@mta.org Sincerely, Michael Carr [post_title] => Technically Speaking, March 2012 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => technically-speaking-march-2012 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-03-25 13:21:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-03-25 17:21:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://cmtassociation.org/?post_type=technically_speaking&p=46670 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => technically_speaking [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [meta_id] => 401144 [post_id] => 46670 [meta_key] => newsletter_content_4_contributor [meta_value] => a:1:{i:0;s:5:"26994";} ) )

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